Diamond Willow

Front Cover
Farrar, Straus and Giroux (BYR), Apr 1, 2008 - Juvenile Fiction - 128 pages
26 Reviews

There’s
more to me than
most people
see.

Twelve-year-old Willow would rather blend in than stick out. But she still wants to be seen for who she is. She wants her parents to notice that she is growing up. She wants her best friend to like her better than she likes a certain boy. She wants, more than anything, to mush the dogs out to her grandparents’ house, by herself, with Roxy in the lead. But sometimes when it’s just you, one mistake can have frightening consequences . . . And when Willow stumbles, it takes a surprising group of friends to help her make things right again.

Using diamond-shaped poems inspired by forms found in polished diamond willow sticks, Helen Frost tells the moving story of Willow and her family. Hidden messages within each diamond carry the reader further, into feelings Willow doesn’t reveal even to herself.

Diamond Willow is a 2009 Bank Street - Best Children's Book of the Year.

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Review: Diamond Willow

User Review  - Richie Partington - Goodreads

23 February 2008 DIAMOND WILLOW by Helen Frost, FSG/Frances Foster Books, April 2008, 112p. ISBN: 0-374-31776-3 "I saw so many things I barely recognized I thought that I was lost but then I saw you ... Read full review

Review: Diamond Willow

User Review  - Patricia Powell - Goodreads

I loved this book so much that now I must read everything that Helen Frost has written. The writing is so solid and the "puzzles" or secret bits only add to the experience. So often, something clever can distract and detract from the story. But this was inspired, all part of the whole. Read full review

About the author (2008)

Helen Frost is the author of several books for young people, including Hidden, Crossing Stones, The Braid, and Keesha’s House, selected an Honor Book for the Michael L. Printz Award. Helen Frost was born in Brookings, South Dakota, the fifth of ten children. She recalls the summer her family moved from South Dakota to Oregon, traveling in a big trailer and camping in places like the Badlands and Yellowstone. Her father told the family stories before they went to sleep, and Helen would dream about their travels, her family, and their old house. “That’s how I became a writer,” she says. “I didn’t know it at the time, but all those things were accumulating somewhere inside me.”  As a child, she loved to travel, think, swim, sing, learn, canoe, write, argue, sew, play the piano, play softball, play with dolls, daydream, read, go fishing, and climb trees. Now, when she sits down to write, her own experiences become the details of her stories. Helen has lived in South Dakota, Oregon, Massachusetts, New York, Vermont, Scotland, Colorado, Alaska, California, and Indiana. She currently lives in Fort Wayne, Indiana, with her family.

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