India Unbound

Front Cover
Anchor Books, 2002 - Business & Economics - 412 pages
99 Reviews
India today is a vibrant free-market democracy, a nation well on its way to overcoming decades of widespread poverty. The nation’s rise is one of the great international stories of the late twentieth century, and in India Unbound the acclaimed columnist Gurcharan Das offers a sweeping economic history of India from independence to the new millennium.

Das shows how India’s policies after 1947 condemned the nation to a hobbled economy until 1991, when the government instituted sweeping reforms that paved the way for extraordinary growth. Das traces these developments and tells the stories of the major players from Nehru through today. As the former CEO of Proctor & Gamble India, Das offers a unique insider’s perspective and he deftly interweaves memoir with history, creating a book that is at once vigorously analytical and vividly written. Impassioned, erudite, and eminently readable, India Unbound is a must for anyone interested in the global economy and its future.

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Review: India Unbound: The Social and Economic Revolution from Independence to the Global Information Age

User Review  - Shruti Sandilya - Goodreads

A very well written book, which highlights not only the roadblocks which India India faced and still does but very optimistically focuses on the solutions which can solve most of its problems that she ... Read full review

Review: India Unbound: The Social and Economic Revolution from Independence to the Global Information Age

User Review  - Manash - Goodreads

After India after Gandhi, this is another must read jewel that one needs to read to understand India- This book surely complements the Ramachandra Guha's “India after Gandhi – while India after Gandhi ... Read full review

About the author (2002)

Gucharan Das, formerly CEO of Procter & Gamble India, is a venture capitalist and consultant, as well as a columnist for the Times of India. He lives in New Delhi.

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