How to Read Chinese Poetry: A Guided Anthology (Google eBook)

Front Cover
Zong-qi Cai
Columbia University Press, Aug 13, 2013 - LITERARY CRITICISM - 426 pages
3 Reviews
In this "guided" anthology, experts lead students through the major genres and eras of Chinese poetry from antiquity to the modern time. The volume is divided into 6 chronological sections and features more than 140 examples of the best shi, sao, fu, ci, and qu poems. A comprehensive introduction and extensive thematic table of contents highlight the thematic, formal, and prosodic features of Chinese poetry, and each chapter is written by a scholar who specializes in a particular period or genre. Poems are presented in Chinese and English and are accompanied by a tone-marked romanized version, an explanation of Chinese linguistic and poetic conventions, and recommended reading strategies. Sound recordings of the poems are available online free of charge. These unique features facilitate an intense engagement with Chinese poetical texts and help the reader derive aesthetic pleasure and insight from these works as one could from the original.

The companion volume How to Read Chinese Poetry Workbook presents 100 famous poems (56 are new selections) in Chinese, English, and romanization, accompanied by prose translation, textual notes, commentaries, and recordings.

Contributors: Robert Ashmore (Univ. of California, Berkeley); Zong-qi Cai; Charles Egan (San Francisco State); Ronald Egan (Univ. of California, Santa Barbara); Grace Fong (McGill); David R. Knechtges (Univ. of Washington); Xinda Lian (Denison); Shuen-fu Lin (Univ. of Michigan); William H. Nienhauser Jr. (Univ. of Wisconsin); Maija Bell Samei; Jui-lung Su (National Univ. of Singapore); Wendy Swartz (Columbia); Xiaofei Tian (Harvard); Paula Varsano (Univ. of California, Berkeley); Fusheng Wu (Univ. of Utah)
  

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LibraryThing Review

User Review  - mvrdrk - LibraryThing

Audio files for many of the poems are provided on the columbia.edu web site. The full address is given in the Preface. -- My father loved this book! He opened it before the winter holiday (I forgot to ... Read full review

Review: How to Read Chinese Poetry: A Guided Anthology

User Review  - Michael Pratt - Goodreads

This volume is an essential reference for any student of Chinese--or simply any poetry lover--interested in how Chinese verse works. The recordings of the anthologized poems which can be downloaded ... Read full review

Contents

II
13
III
15
IV
16
V
17
VI
18
VII
20
VIII
22
IX
23
LXXXIII
213
LXXXIV
214
LXXXV
216
LXXXVI
217
LXXXVII
218
LXXXVIII
219
LXXXIX
226
XC
227

X
25
XI
26
XII
27
XIII
29
XIV
30
XVI
36
XVII
38
XVIII
40
XIX
41
XX
59
XXI
61
XXII
84
XXIII
85
XXIV
86
XXV
88
XXVI
90
XXVII
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XXVIII
93
XXIX
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XXX
97
XXXI
103
XXXII
105
XXXIII
106
XXXIV
107
XXXV
110
XXXVI
111
XXXVII
115
XXXVIII
121
XXXIX
122
XL
125
XLI
126
XLII
128
XLIII
130
XLIV
133
XLV
135
XLVI
141
XLVII
142
XLVIII
143
XLIX
144
L
145
LI
146
LII
148
LIII
149
LIV
150
LV
151
LVI
152
LVII
154
LVIII
161
LIX
162
LX
174
LXI
176
LXII
177
LXIII
181
LXIV
182
LXV
184
LXVI
186
LXVII
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LXVIII
189
LXX
191
LXXI
193
LXXII
195
LXXIII
199
LXXIV
202
LXXV
204
LXXVI
205
LXXVII
206
LXXVIII
207
LXXIX
209
LXXX
210
LXXXI
211
LXXXII
212
XCI
230
XCII
232
XCIII
238
XCIV
245
XCV
246
XCVI
249
XCVII
250
XCVIII
251
XCIX
253
C
254
CI
255
CII
257
CIII
258
CIV
262
CV
264
CVI
268
CVII
270
CVIII
273
CIX
276
CX
280
CXI
286
CXIII
287
CXIV
288
CXV
296
CXVI
308
CXVII
309
CXVIII
311
CXIX
313
CXX
315
CXXI
317
CXXII
320
CXXIII
322
CXXIV
323
CXXV
324
CXXVI
329
CXXVII
330
CXXVIII
332
CXXIX
334
CXXX
335
CXXXI
338
CXXXII
340
CXXXIII
342
CXXXIV
344
CXXXV
345
CXXXVI
347
CXXXVII
354
CXXXVIII
355
CXXXIX
357
CXL
359
CXLI
360
CXLII
362
CXLIII
364
CXLIV
369
CXLVI
370
CXLVII
371
CXLVIII
372
CXLIX
373
CL
374
CLI
375
CLII
379
CLIII
388
CLIV
391
CLV
394
CLVI
395
CLVII
396
CLVIII
401
CLIX
403
CLX
405
CLXI
407
CLXII
411
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About the author (2013)

Zong-qi Cai is professor of Chinese and comparative literature at the University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign. He is the author of The Matrix of Lyric Transformation: Poetic Modes and Self-Presentation in Early Chinese Pentasyllabic Poetry (Michigan, 1996) and Configurations of Comparative Poetics: Three Perspectives on Western and Chinese Literary Criticism (Hawai'i, 2002), and is the editor of A Chinese Literary Mind: Culture, Creativity, and Rhetoric in Wenxin dialong (Stanford, 2001) and Chinese Aesthetics: The Ordering of Literature, the Arts, and the Universe in the Six Dynasties (Hawai'i, 2004).

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