Specimens of English Dramatic Poets: Who Lived about the Time of Shakespeare. With Notes (Google eBook)

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Charles Lamb
Wiley & Putnam, 1845 - English drama
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Page 32 - All things that move between the quiet poles Shall be at my command : emperors and kings Are but obeyed in their several provinces, Nor can they raise the wind or rend the clouds ; But his dominion that exceeds in this Stretcheth as far as doth the mind of man, A sound magician is a mighty god : Here, Faustus, tire thy brains to gain a deity.
Page 33 - I'll have them read me strange philosophy And tell the secrets of all foreign kings; I'll have them wall all Germany with brass, And make swift Rhine circle fair Wittenberg; I'll have them fill the public schools with silk...
Page 178 - Yes, as rocks are, When foamy billows split themselves against Their flinty ribs ; or as the moon is moved, When wolves, with hunger pined, howl at her brightness.
Page 112 - Why, gentle boy, I find no fault at all In thy behaviour. Bel. Sir, if I have made A fault in ignorance, instruct my youth : I shall be willing, if not apt, to learn ; Age and experience will adorn my mind With larger knowledge ; and if I have done A wilful fault, think me not past all hope For once. What master holds so strict a hand Over his boy, that he will part with him Without one warning ? Let me be corrected, To break my stubbornness, if it be so, Rather than turn me off; and I shall mend.
Page 30 - He surfeits on the cursed necromancy. Nothing so sweet as magic is to him, Which he prefers before his chiefest bliss, And this the man that in his study sits.
Page 106 - Do my face (If thou had'st ever feeling of a sorrow) Thus, thus, Antiphila : strive to make me look Like Sorrow's monument ; and the trees about me, Let them be dry and leafless ; let the rocks Groan with continual surges ; and behind me, Make all a desolation.
Page 37 - O, no end is limited to damned souls. Why wert thou not a creature wanting soul? Or, why is this immortal that thou hast? Ah, Pythagoras' metempsychosis, were that true, This soul should fly from me, and I be changed Unto some brutish beast.
Page 171 - In those unsightly rings - then 'twas a face So far beyond the artificial shine Of any woman's bought complexion, That the uprightest man (if such there be That sin but seven times a day) broke custom, And made up eight with looking after her. O, she was able to ha...
Page 88 - For I do mean To have a list of wives and concubines, Equal with Solomon, who had the stone Alike with me ; and I will make me a back With the elixir, that shall be as tough As Hercules, to encounter fifty a night.
Page 36 - Stand still, you ever-moving spheres of heaven, That time may cease, and midnight never come; Fair Nature's eye, rise, rise again, and make Perpetual day; or let this hour be but A year, a month, a week, a natural day, That Faustus may repent and save his soul! O lente, lente currite, noctis equi! The stars move still, time runs, the clock will strike, The devil will come, and Faustus must be damn'd.

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