Demonstrations of anatomy (Google eBook)

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Page 848 - Familiar Letters on Chemistry, in its relations to physiology, Dietetics, Agriculture, Commerce, and Political Economy. By JUSTUS VON LIEBIG.
Page 303 - ... and is inserted into the base of the metacarpal bone of the index finger, and by a slip into the base of the metacarpal bone of the middle finger.
Page 843 - ILLUSTRATIONS Of DISSECTIONS. In a Series of Original Coloured Plates, the size of Life, representing the Dissection of the Human Body. By GV ELLIS and GH FORD.
Page 846 - With these plates, and such as these, by his side, the learner will be well guided in his dissection ; and under' their guidance he may safely continue his study when out of the dissecting-room. — With such plates as these, the surgeon will be fully reminded of all that is needful in anatomy when engaged in planning an operation.
Page 848 - HOFMANN'S MODERN CHEMISTRY. Experimental and Theoretic. Small 8vo, 4s. 6d. " It is in the truest sense an introduction to chemistry; and as such it possesses the highest value— a value which is equally great to the student, new to the science, and to the lecturer who has spent years in teaching it.
Page 490 - The dissector has observed that the spermatic cord in the male and the round ligament in the female pierces the abdominal wall above Poupart's ligament.
Page 845 - Demonstrations Of Anatomy. A Guide to the Dissection of the Human Body. By GEORGE VINER ELLIS, Professor of Anatomy in University College, London.
Page 845 - SCIENCE AND ART OF SURGERY; a Treatise on Surgical Injuries, Diseases, and Operations. By Sir JOHN ERIC ERICHSEN, Bart., FRS, LL.D.
Page 330 - It usually shows grooves for the tendons of the extensors of the metacarpal bone and first phalanx of the thumb, which pass over it.
Page 847 - It is a thoroughly sound piece of observation and practical application of experience. It is so thoroughly clinical that it is impossible to review it. But from the therapeutical point of view, which chiefly interests us, we may recommend it with great confidence; and it is certainly a very much needed work in this respect, for the text-books, which have hitherto been standards on the subject, have been extraordinarily conservative in their tendencies, and have tended to perpetuate not a little of...

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