The Floating Island (Google eBook)

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Gottschalk Print. Company, pref., 1908 - College theater - 31 pages
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Page 16 - ... with their grooms and mademoiselles. There while they acted and overacted, among other young scholars, I was a spectator; they thought themselves gallant men, and I thought them fools ; they made sport, and T laughed ; they mispronounced, and I misliked ; and to make up the atticism, they were out, and I hissed.
Page 16 - ... seen so often upon the stage, writhing and unboning their clergy limbs to all the antic and dishonest gestures of Trinculoes, buffoons, and bawds ; prostituting the shame of that ministry, which either they had, or were nigh having, to the eyes of courtiers and court ladies, with their grooms and mademoiselles. There while they acted and overacted, among other young scholars, I was a spectator; they thought themselves gallant men, and I thought them fools...
Page 23 - In comedies the greatest skill is this, rightly to touch All things to the quick ; and eke to frame each person so, That by his common talk you may his nature rightly know : A roister ought not preach, that were too strange to hear, But as from virtue he doth swerve, so ought his words appear : The old man is sober, the young man rash, the lover triumphing in joys. The matron grave, the harlot wild, and full of wanton toys.
Page 16 - Judge now whether so many good textmen were not sufficient to instruct me of false beards and vizards, without more expositors; and how can this confuter take the face to object to me the seeing of that which his reverend prelates allow, and incite their young disciples to act?
Page 16 - There, whilst they acted and overacted, among other young scholars, I was a spectator : they thought themselves gallant men, and I thought them fools; they made sport, and I laughed; they mispronounced, and I misliked ; and, to make up the atticism, they were out, and I hissed.
Page 18 - In one copy lines 9-1 1 read as follows : At every shake The leaves did quake : The aspin tree thence learn'd to play.] IN COMMENDATION OF MUSICK When whispering straynes doe softly steale With creeping passion through the hart, And when at every touch wee feele Our pulses beate and beare a part ; When thredds can make A hartstring shake Philosophic Can scarce deny The sonlc consists of harmony.
Page 7 - Ift be a fault to speak this foreign language, (For Latin is our mother tongue*) I must entreat you To frame excuses for us; for whose sake We now speak English.
Page 13 - ... with the one just mentioned, also played a considerable part in the great struggle. Two or three other William Strodes were living at the same time, but these were quite undistinguished persons. Of our William Strode there is little more to be recorded, so far as his personal history is concerned. He married a daughter of Dr. Simpson, Prebendary of Canterbury, by whom he had an only daughter, who became the wife of Henry Langley, Master of Arts, of Wadham College. The poet died on March 10...
Page 19 - BEFORE you read so farre as the Prologue, be pleased to consider this Tragi-comedy was both written and presented above eighteen years since ; and if now it seem (in Language or Plot) to fit these times, it must be by Prophesie, the Author also himselfe having been long dead. He wrote it at the instance of those who might command him ; else he had scarce condescended to a Play, his serious thoughts being fill'd with notions of deeper consideration.
Page 19 - Church, on the 29th of August, 1636, before the king, for whose diversion it was purposely written at the request of the dean and chapter. It contained too much morality to suit the taste of the court ; yet it pleased the king so well, that he soon after bestowed a canon's dignity on the author. The airs and songs were " set by Mr. Henry Lawes, servant to his late Majesty in his publick and private musick.

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