A Reference Grammar of Modern Standard Arabic (Google eBook)

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Cambridge University Press, Aug 25, 2005 - Foreign Language Study - 734 pages
3 Reviews
A Reference Grammar of Modern Standard Arabic is a comprehensive handbook on the structure of Arabic. Keeping technical terminology to a minimum, it provides a detailed yet accessible overview of Modern Standard Arabic in which the essential aspects of its phonology, morphology and syntax can be readily looked up and understood. Accompanied by extensive carefully-chosen examples, it will prove invaluable as a practical guide for supporting students' textbooks, classroom work or self-study, and will also be a useful resource for scholars and professionals wishing to develop an understanding of the key features of the language. Grammar notes are numbered for ease of reference, and a section is included on how to use an Arabic dictionary, as well as helpful glossaries of Arabic and English linguistic terms and a useful bibliography. Clearly structured and systematically organised, this book is set to become the standard guide to the grammar of contemporary Arabic.
  

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Review: A Reference Grammar of Modern Standard Arabic (Reference Grammars)

User Review  - Lorin Kleinman - Goodreads

This isn't a book you'd want to read straight through, but if you're learning Arabic and want to understand the grammar, it's an extraordinarily useful resource, in which you can either get quick ... Read full review

Contents

1Introduction to Arabic
1
Compound adjectives
7
Phonology and script
10
an overview
44
Basic Arabic sentence structures
57
Arabic noun types
74
active and passive
102
gender humanness number definiteness and case
119
Form III triliteral verb
503
Geminate doubled root Form III
504
Assimilated roots in Form III
505
Doubly weak roots in Form III
506
Form IV triliteral verb
515
2Regular sound triliteral root
516
Hamzated roots in Form IV
517
Defective roots in Form IV
518

Construct phrases and nouns in apposition
205
9Noun specifiers and quantifiers
228
function and form
239
Adverbs and adverbial expressions
276
Personal pronouns
298
Demonstrative pronouns
315
Relative pronouns and relative clauses
322
Numerals and numeral phrases
329
Prepositions and prepositional phrases
366
Questions and question words
401
maa La and maadhaa I jl_ what
403
man who whom
405
Connectives and conjunctions
407
waandwaowolcaTfukJljlj
409
fa _s and so and then yet and thus
410
Contrastive conjunctions
411
Explanatory conjunctions
412
Adverbial conjunctions
413
Disjunctives
417
Sentencestarting connectives
419
the particle inna and her sisters
422
The particles
425
Verb classes
429
awzaan alficl JjckJI ojj
433
a summary
438
compound verbs qad and verb strings
446
The base form triliteral verb
455
Regular sound triliteral root alfi cl alSaHUH alsaalim JLJI H JjckJI
456
Geminate verb root alficl almuDaccafi ktni JakJI
458
Hamzated verb root alficl almahmuuz jjfJI JakJI
460
Hollow root alficl alajwaf cJaVl JakJI
461
Defective verb root alficl alnaaqiS jlllH JakJI
463
Doubly weak or mixed verb root
464
Verbal nouns of Form I
465
Form I participles
470
Form II
491
2Regular sound triliteral root
492
Assimilated roots in Form II
493
Doubly weak roots in Form II
494
Form II participles
496
Examples of Form IV verbs in context
519
Form IV participles
521
Form V triliteral verb
530
2Regular sound triliteral root
531
Assimilated roots in Form V
532
Doubly weak roots in Form V
533
Form V participles
534
Form VI triliteral verb
543
Geminate doubled root Form VI
544
Assimilated roots in Form VI
545
verbal noun
546
Form VI participles
547
Form VII triliteral verb
555
2Regular sound triliteral root
556
Assimilated roots in Form VII
557
Form VII participles
558
Form VIII triliteral verb
565
2Regular or sound roots
568
Assimilated roots in Form VIII
569
Verbal nouns of Form VIII
570
Form VIII participles
571
Form IX triliteral verb
579
Geminate doubled roots Form IX
580
Form IX participles
581
Form X triliteral verb
584
Soundregular root
585
Defective roots in Form X
586
Form X participles
587
Forms XIXV triliteral verb
596
ifcawwala djl yafcawwilu Jj
597
indicative and subjunctive
606
jussive and imperative
616
Verbs of being becoming remaining seeming
634
Negation and exception
641
Passive and passivetype expressions
657
Conditional and optative expressions
671
To express the concept of multi as the first component of an Arabic compound
i
How to use an Arabic dictionary 677
xx
Glossary of technical terms 682
691
Copyright

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Page 13 - that variety of Arabic that is found in contemporary books, newspapers, and magazines, and that is used orally in formal speeches, public lectures, learned debates, religious ceremonials8 and in news broadcasts over radio and television.

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About the author (2005)

Karin C. Ryding is Sultan Qaboos bin Said Professor of Arabic, Department of Arabic Language, Literature and Linguistics, Georgetown University.

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