Grand Avenue

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Penguin, 1995 - Fiction - 229 pages
5 Reviews
Grand Avenue, a street in the center of the northern California town of Santa Rosa where "everybody's connected to everybody, " is home not only to Pomo Indians making a life outside of the reservation but also to Mexicans, blacks, and some Portuguese, all trying to find their way among the many obstacles in their turbulent world. Bound together by a lone ancestor, the lives of the Native Americans from the core of these stories - tales full of cures, poison, family healing rituals, and a kind of humor that allows the inhabitants of Grand Avenue to see their own foibles with a saving grace. A teenage girl falls in love with a crippled horse marked for slaughter . . . an aging healer summons his strength for one final song . . . a father seeks a bond with his illegitimate son . . . a mother searches for the power to care for her cancer-stricken daughter's spirit. Here is a tapestry of lives rendered with the color, wisdom, and quest for meaning of the traditional tale-telling in which they are rooted. Vibrant with the emotions and realities of a changing world, these stories are all equally stunning and from the heart.

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Review: Grand Avenue: A Novel in Stories

User Review  - Tiffany Sanasie - Goodreads

Very confusing. Too many characters. Chapters were random and hardly connected. Read full review

Review: Grand Avenue: A Novel in Stories

User Review  - Iain Coggins - Goodreads

Still haven't gotten to reading it after all these years. Written by an author from my hometown (Santa Rosa, California),and set there. Read full review

Contents

The Magic Pony K a Ay
3
The Progress of This DiseasP
27
Slaughterhouse rCnVLj
51
Copyright

7 other sections not shown

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About the author (1995)

Part American Indian, Filipino, and Jewish, Greg Sarris was adopted at birth and raised in both Indian and white families. He is Chairman of the Federated Indians of Graton Rancheria and the Endowed Chair in Native American Studies at Sonoma State University. His books include "Keeping Slug Woman Alive: Essays Toward a Holistic Approach to American Indian Texts" (California, 1993), "Watermelon Nights" (1998), "Grand Avenue" (1994), and "The Sound of Rattles and Clappers: An Anthology of California Indian Writing" (1994).

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