Madras: The Southern and west coast districts, native states, and French possessions (Google eBook)

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Superintendent of Government Printing, 1908 - Madras (India)
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Page 254 - If it were proposed to select one temple which should exhibit all the beauties of the Dravidian style in their greatest perfection, and at the same time exemplify all its characteristic defects of design, the choice would almost inevitably fall on that at Ramisseram, in the island of Paumben (Woodcut No.
Page 254 - None of our cathedrals are more than 500 feet, and even the nave of St. Peter's is only 600 feet from the door to the apse. Here the side corridors are 700 feet long, and open into transverse galleries as rich in detail as themselves. These, with the varied devices and modes of lighting, produce an effect that is not equalled certainly anywhere in India.
Page 254 - Ramesvaram. In no other temple has the same amount of patient industry been exhibited as here ; and in none, unfortunately, has that labour been so thrown away for want of a design appropriate to its display. . . . While the temple at Tanjore produces an effect greater than is due to its mass or detail, this one, with double its dimensions and ten times its elaboration, produces no effect externally, and internally can only be seen in detail, so that the parts hardly in any instance aid one another...
Page 125 - ... the only means of ingress into the citadel through a narrow stone gateway facing the bridge. Several ruins of fine buildings are situated inside the fort. Of these the most remarkable are the two pagodas, the Kaliyana Mahal, the Gymkhana, the Granaries, and the 'Idgah.
Page 254 - The glory of the temple is in its corridors. These extend to a total length of nearly 4,000 feet. Their breadth varies from 20 feet to 30 feet of free floor space, and their height is apparently about 30 feet from the floor to the centre of the roof. Each pillar or pier is compound, and richer and more elaborate in design than those of the parvati porch at Chidambaram, and certainly more modern in date. " None of our English cathedrals are more than 500 feet long, and even the nave of St.
Page 401 - The coast, for a short distance along the borders of the lake, is generally flat; retreating from it the surface immediately becomes unequal, roughening into slopes which gradually combine and swell into the mountainous amphitheatre that bounds it on the east, where it falls precipitately, but terminates less abruptly on the south. The collected villages, waving plains, palmyra topes, and extensive cultivation of...
Page 487 - Chandernagore, in Lower Bengal, had been acquired by the French Company in 1688, by grant from the Delhi emperor ; Mahe, on the Malabar coast, was obtained in 1725-6, under the government of M. Lenoir ; Karikal, on the Coromandel coast, under that of M. Dumas in 1739.
Page 407 - Government, to hold no communication with any foreign State, and to admit no European foreigner into his service or to remain within his territories without the previous sanction of the British Government.
Page 254 - The glory of the temple, however, is in its corridors. These extend to a total length of nearly 4000 feet. Their breadth varies from 20 feet to 30 feet of free floor space, and their height is apparently about 30 feet from the floor to the centre of the roof. Each pillar or pier is compound, and richer and more elaborate in design than those of the Parvati porch at Chidambaram, and certainly more modern in date.
Page 328 - Seleucids ; the Egyptians under the Ptolemies ; the Romans under the Emperors ; the Arabs after the conquest of Egypt and Persia ; the Italians, more especially the Republics of Venice, Florence, and Genoa, have each in turn maintained a direct trade with the western ports of the Madras Presidency. In the early political history of Malabar, the first figure that emerges distinctly from the mist of tradition is Cherumdn Perumal, the last of the sovereigns of Chera.

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