The Construction of Reality in the Child

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Psychology Press, 1999 - Psychology - 386 pages
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First published in 1999. Routledge is an imprint of Taylor & Francis, an informa company.
  

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Contents

CHAPTER I
3
active search for the vanished object
44
the child takes account of the sequential dis
66
the representation of invisible displace
79
CHAPTER 2
97
the coordination of practical groups and
113
the transition from subjective to objective
152
objective groups
183
the elementary externalization and objectifi
256
the real objectification and spatialization
271
representative causality and the residues
293
The origins of causality
308
time itself and the practical series
322
the beginnings of the objectification
335
CONCLUSION
350
From sensorimotor universe to representation of the childs
364

representative groups
203
CHAPTER 3
219
Conclusion
380
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About the author (1999)

Jean Piaget, a Swiss psychologist, whose original training was in the natural sciences, spent much of his career studying the psychological development of children, largely at the Institut J.J. Rousseau at the University of Geneva, but also at home, with his own children as subjects. The impact of this research on child psychology has been enormous, and Piaget is the starting point for those seeking to learn how children view numbers, how they think of cause-and-effect relationships, or how they make moral judgments. Piaget found that cognitive development from infancy to adolescence invariably proceeds in four major stages from infancy to adolescence: sensory-motor, preoperational, concrete operational, and formal operational. Each of these stages is marked by the development of cognitive structures, making possible the solution of problems that were impossible earlier and laying the foundation for the cognitive advances of the next stage. He showed that rational adult thinking is the culmination of an extensive process that begins with elementary sensory experiences and unfolds gradually until the individual is capable of dealing with imagined concepts, that is, abstract thought. By learning how children comprehend the world and how their intellectual processes mature, Piaget contributed much to the theory of knowledge as an active process in which the mind transforms reality. Put simply, Piaget described children from a perspective that no one before had seen.

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