The Lotus Sutra

Front Cover
Columbia University Press, 1993 - Religion - 359 pages
16 Reviews
Since its appearance in China in the third century, the Lotus Sutra has been regarded as one of the most illustrious scriptures in the Mahayana Buddhist canon. The object of intense veneration among generations of Buddhists in China, Korea, Japan, and other parts of East Asia, it has attracted more commentary than any other Buddhist scripture and has had a profound impact on the great works of Japanese and Chinese literature. Conceived as a drama of colossal proportions, the text takes on new meaning in Burton Watson's translation. Depicting events in a cosmic world that transcends ordinary concepts of time and space, the Lotus Sutra presents abstract religious concepts in concrete terms and affirms that there is a single path to enlightenment - that of the bodhisattva - and that the Buddha is not to be delimited in time and space. Filled with striking imagery. memorable parables, and countless revelations concerning the universal accessibility of Buddhahood, the Lotus Sutra has brought comfort and wisdom to devotees over the centuries and stands as a pivotal text in world literature. As Watson notes, "The Lotus Sutra is not so much an integral work as a collection of religious texts, an anthology of sermons, stories and devotional manuals, some speaking with particular force to persons of one type or in one set of circumstances, some to those of another type or in other circumstances. This is no doubt one reason why it has had such broad and lasting appeal over the ages and has permeated so deeply into the cultures that have been exposed to it."
  

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Review: The Lotus Sutra

User Review  - Minerva Ty - Goodreads

Awesome translation! The first Lotus Sutra that I read 10 years ago. :) Read full review

Review: The Lotus Sutra

User Review  - Volmarr Wyrd - Goodreads

This is basically _the_ book to read to come to understand Mahayana Buddhism. The best way to read it is go to your local Mahayana Buddhist temple at any time that the monks are chanting it and read ... Read full review

Contents

Introduction
1
Expedient Means
21
Simile and Parable
45
Belief and Understanding
78
The Parable of the Medicinal Herbs
95
Bestowal of Prophecy
105
The Parable of the Phantom City
115
Prophecy of Enlightenment for Five Hundred Disciples
141
Distinctions in Benefits
231
The Benefits of Responding with Joy
243
Benefits of the Teacher of the Law
249
The Bodhisattva Never Disparaging
263
Supernatural Powers of the Thus Come One
270
Entrustment
275
Former Affairs of the Bodhisttva Medicine King
278
The Bodhisattva Wonderful Sound
288

Prophecies Conferred on Learners and Adepts
152
The Teacher of the Law
158
The Emergence of the Treasure Tower
168
Devadatta
180
Encouraging Devotion
188
Peaceful Practices
194
Emerging from the Earth
210
The Life Span of the Thus Come One
222
The Universal Gateway of the Bodhisattva Perceiver of the Worlds Sounds
296
Dharani
305
Former Affairs of King Wonderful Adornment
310
Encouragements of the Bodhisattva Universal Worthy
317
Glossary
323
Index
341
Copyright

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Page xxii - standard romanization for all such words may be found in the Glossary at the back of the book. The Glossary will also

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About the author (1993)

Edward D. berkowitz is professor of history and public policy and public administration at George Washington University. He is the author of eight books and the editor of three collections. During the seventies he served as a staff member of the President's Commission for a National Agenda, helping President Carter plan for a second term that never came to be.

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