Introduction to Mathematical Philosophy (Google eBook)

Front Cover
Digireads.com Publishing, Jan 1, 2011 - Mathematics
11 Reviews
As a mathematician, philosopher, logician, historian, socialist, pacifist and social critic, Bertrand Russell is noted for his "revolt against idealism" in Britain in the early 20th century, as well as his pacifist activism during WWI, a campaign against Adolf Hitler and later the United States' involvement in the Vietnam War. In addition to his political activism, he is considered to be one of the founders of analytic philosophy, receiving the Nobel Prize in Literature in 1950 for his various humanitarian and philosophical works. He wrote his "Introduction to Mathematical Philosophy" (1919) in order to elucidate in a less technical way the main ideas of his and N.A. Whitehead's earlier "Principia Mathematica". The work focuses on mathematical logic as related to traditional and contemporary philosophy, of which Russell remarks, "logic is the youth of mathematics and mathematics is the manhood of logic." It is regarded today as a lucid, accessible exploration of the gray area where mathematics and philosophy meet.
  

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Review: Introduction to Mathematical Philosophy

User Review  - Zach Augustine - Goodreads

"For the moment, I do not know how to define "tautology"....It would be easy to offer a definition which might seem satisfactory for a while; but I know of none that I feel to be satisfactory, in ... Read full review

Review: Introduction to Mathematical Philosophy

User Review  - Hevel Cava - Goodreads

Excellent! Read full review

Contents

I
6
II
11
III
16
IV
21
V
28
VI
33
VII
39
VIII
47
XI
62
XII
67
XIII
75
XIV
81
XV
88
XVI
94
XVII
101
XVIII
108

IX
53
X
57

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About the author (2011)

Bertrand Arthur William Russell (1872-1970) was a British philosopher, logician, essayist and social critic. He was best known for his work in mathematical logic and analytic philosophy. Together with G.E. Moore, Russell is generally recognized as one of the main founders of modern analytic philosophy. Together with Kurt Gödel, he is regularly credited with being one of the most important logicians of the twentieth century. Over the course of a long career, Russell also made contributions to a broad range of subjects, including the history of ideas, ethics, political and educational theory, and religious studies. General readers have benefited from his many popular writings on a wide variety of topics. After a life marked by controversy--including dismissals from both Trinity College, Cambridge, and City College, New York--Russell was awarded the Order of Merit in 1949 and the Nobel Prize for Literature in 1950. Noted also for his many spirited anti-nuclear protests and for his campaign against western involvement in the Vietnam War, Russell remained a prominent public figure until his death at the age of 97.

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