Bright Young People: The Lost Generation of London's Jazz Age

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Macmillan, Jan 6, 2009 - History - 361 pages
22 Reviews
Before the media circus of Britney, Paris, and our modern obsession with celebrity, there were the Bright Young People, a voraciously pleasure-seeking band of bohemian party-givers and blue-blooded socialites who romped through the gossip columns of 1920s London. Evelyn Waugh immortalized their slang, their pranks, and their tragedies in his novels, and over the next half century, many—from Cecil Beaton to Nancy Mitford and John Betjeman—would become household names. But beneath the veneer of hedonism and practical jokes was a tormented generation, brought up in the shadow of war. Sparkling talent was too often brought low by alcoholism and addiction. Drawing on the virtuosic and often wrenching writings of the Bright Young People themselves, the biographer and novelist D. J. Taylor has produced an enthralling account of an age of fleeting brilliance.
  

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Review: Bright Young People: The Rise and Fall of a Generation 1918-1940

User Review  - Marguerite Kaye - Goodreads

This was a re-read for me, since I'm currently writing in the 1920s. A very detailed book, which covers the start of the Roaring Twenties in the UK after the War, right up to the next War. All the ... Read full review

Review: Bright Young People: The Rise and Fall of a Generation 1918-1940

User Review  - Ari - Goodreads

I'm not sure how I came across this book but the name sounded cool, 'Bright Young People'. Of course after I read the description it became clear that the author was not necessarily referring to their ... Read full review

Contents

Dionysius in Mayfair
3
Figures in a Landscape
15
The Society Racket
40
Young Men on the Make London 192428
60
Parents and Children
93
The Revolt into Style
117
Partygoing 1929
139
Success and Failure Two Portraits
166
Celebrity Culture
209
Gay Young People
230
After the Dance 193139
252
Projections
282
Gone to Report 1940 and After
307
Darling Eddie Love B
325
Notes and Further Reading
329
Index
347

Decline and Fall 193031
187

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About the author (2009)

D. J. Taylor is a literary critic and the author of two acclaimed biographies—Thackeray and Orwell: The Life, which won the Whitbread biography prize in 2003—and six novels, including Kept: A Victorian Mystery. He lives in Norwich, England.

Bibliographic information