Information Architecture for the World Wide Web

Front Cover
"O'Reilly Media, Inc.", 2002 - Computers - 461 pages
51 Reviews

Today's web sites have moved far beyond "brochureware." They are larger and more complex, have great strategic value to their sponsors, and their users are busier and less forgiving. Designers, information architects, and web site managers are required to juggle vast amounts of information, frequent changes, new technologies, and sometimes even multiple objectives, making some web sites look like a fast-growing but poorly planned city-roads everywhere, but impossible to navigate. Well-planned information architecture has never been as essential as it is now.

Information Architecture for the World Wide Web, 2nd Edition, shows you how to blend aesthetics and mechanics for distinctive, cohesive web sites that work. Most books on web development concentrate on either the graphics or the technical issues of a site. This book focuses on the framework that holds the two together.

This edition contains more than 75% new material. You'll find updated chapters on organization, labeling, navigation, and searching; and a new chapter on thesauri, controlled vocabularies and metadata will help you understand the interconnectedness of these systems. The authors have expanded the methodology chapters to include a more interdisciplinary collection of tools and techniques. They've also complemented the top-down strategies of the first edition with bottom-up approaches that enable distributed, emergent solutions.

A whole new section addresses the opportunities and challenges of practicing information architecture, while another section discusses how that work impacts and is influenced by the broader organizational context. New case studies provide models for creating enterprise intranet portals and online communities. Finally, you'll find pointers to a wealth of essential information architecture resources, many of which did not exist a few years ago.

By applying the principles outlined in this completely updated classic, you'll build web sites and intranets that are easier to navigate and appealing to your users, as well as scalable and simple to maintain.Information Architecture for the World Wide Web, 2nd Edition is a treasure trove of ideas and practical advice for anyone involved in building or maintaining a large, complex web site or intranet.

  

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Review: Information Architecture for the World Wide Web: Designing Large-Scale Web Sites

User Review  - Marie - Goodreads

I'm so done with this book. And so done with schoolstuff. But it's a quite good book, good writing! Read full review

Review: Information Architecture for the World Wide Web: Designing Large-Scale Web Sites

User Review  - Andrew Stella-vega - Goodreads

It was alright. I didn't go in with any preconceived notions and it ended up highlighting things I had learned by practice in the industry as a programmer and also opened my eyes to a few other items I had not considered. Read full review

Selected pages

Contents

Defining Information Architecture
3
A Definition
4
Tablets Scrolls Books and Libraries
6
Explaining IA to Others
8
What Isnt Information Architecture?
9
Why Information Architecture Matters
11
Bringing Our Work to Life
12
Practicing Information Architecture
16
The Project Plan
267
Design and Documentation
270
Guidelines for Diagramming an Information Architecture
271
Blueprints
272
Wireframes
283
Content Mapping and Inventory
289
Content Modeling
293
Controlled Vocabularies
298

Do We Need Information Architects?
17
Whos Qualified to Practice Information Architecture?
18
Information Architecture Specialists
22
Practicing Information Architecture in the Real World
23
Information Ecologies
24
What Lies Ahead
27
User Needs and Behaviors
28
The TooSimple Information Model
29
Information Needs
30
Information Seeking Behaviors
32
Basic Principles of Information Architecture
37
The Anatomy of an Information Architecture
39
Information Architecture Components
46
Organization Systems
50
Organizing Web Sites and Intranets
55
Organization Structures
64
Creating Cohesive Organization Systems
74
Labeling Systems
76
Why You Should Care About Labeling
77
Varieties of Labels
80
Designing Labels
92
Navigation Systems
106
Types of Navigation Systems
107
Gray Matters
108
Building Context
110
Improving Flexibility
111
Embedded Navigation Systems
112
Supplemental Navigation Systems
121
Advanced Navigation Approaches
127
Search Systems
132
Basic Search System Anatomy
135
Choosing What to Search
137
Search Algorithms
144
Presenting Results
149
Designing the Search Interface
163
Where to Learn More
174
Thesauri Controlled Vocabularies and Metadata
176
Controlled Vocabularies
177
Technical Lingo
187
A Thesaurus in Action
188
Types of Thesauri
193
Thesaurus Standards
196
Semantic Relationships
198
Preferred Terms
200
Polyhierarchy
202
Faceted Classification
204
Research
211
A Research Framework
213
Content
219
Users
226
Participant Definition and Recruiting
230
User Research Sessions
233
In Defense of Research
240
Strategy
243
What Is an Information Architecture Strategy?
244
Strategies Under Attack
245
From Research to Strategy
247
Developing the Strategy
248
Work Products and Deliverables
252
The Strategy Report
257
Design Sketches
300
WebBased Prototypes
301
Architecture Style Guides
302
PointofProduction Architecture
303
Administration
304
Information Architecture in Practice
305
Education
307
A World of Choice
308
But Do I Need a Degree?
309
Ethics
311
Shaping the Future
314
Building an Information Architecture Team
315
Destructive Acts of Creation
316
Project Versus Program
318
Buy or Rent
319
Do We Really Need to Hire Professionals?
320
The Dream Team
321
Tools and Software
323
Categories in Chaos
324
Questions to Ask
330
Information Architecture in the Organization
331
Making the Case for Information Architecture
333
The Two Kinds of People in the World
334
Talking to the Reactionaries
339
Other CaseMaking Techniques
341
The Information Architecture Value Checklist
344
A Final Note
345
Business Strategy
346
The Origins of Strategy
347
Defining Business Strategy
348
Alignment
349
Strategic Fit
350
Exposing Gaps in Business Strategy
352
One Best Way
353
Understanding Our Elephant
355
Competitive Advantage
357
The End of the Beginning
358
Information Architecture for the Enterprise
360
Economies Dont Always Scale
361
Think Different
362
The Ultimate Goal
363
A Framework for Centralization
366
A Phased Rollout
371
Who Does What
376
A Framework for Moving Forward
379
Case Studies
381
MSWeb An Enterprise Intranet
383
Challenges for the Information Architect
385
We Like Taxonomies Whatever They Are
386
Benefits to Users
407
Whats Next
411
MSWebs Achievement
412
evoltorg An Online Community
413
evoltorg in a Nutshell
414
The Participation Economy
415
How Information Architecture Fits In
425
The UnInformation Architecture
428
Essential Resources
429
Index
441
Copyright

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About the author (2002)

Lou Rosenfeld is an independent information architecture consultant. He has been instrumental in helping establish the field of information architecture, and in articulating the role and value of librarianship within the field. Lou played a leading role in organizing and programming the first three information architecture conferences (both ASIS&T Summits and IA 2000). He also presents and moderates at such venues as CHI, COMDEX, Intranets, and the web design conferences produced by Miller Freeman, C|net and Thunder Lizard. He teaches tutorials as part of the Nielsen Norman Group User Experience Conference.

Peter Morville is President and Founder of Semantic Studios, a leading information architecture and knowledge management consulting firm. From 1994 to 2001, Peter was Chief Executive Officer and a co-owner of Argus Associates, a pioneering information architecture design firm with world-class clients including 3Com, AT&T, Compaq, Ernst & Young, Ford, IBM, Microsoft, Procter & Gamble, and the Weather Channel. He also served as Executive Director of the ACIA. Over the past 8 years, Peter has written and spoken extensively about information architecture, business strategy, and knowledge management. He has been interviewed by Business Week, Knowledge Management magazine, MSNBC, and the Wall Street Journal.

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