Horses, Saddles and Bridles (Google eBook)

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Lord Baltimore Press, The Friedenwald Company, 1906 - Cavalry - 405 pages
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Page 266 - During the drills the recruits are taught the following rules for the care of horses, until the instructor is satisfied by means of questions that they are thoroughly comprehended : Never threaten, strike, or otherwise abuse a horse. Before entering a stall, speak to the horse gently and then go in quietly. Never take a rapid gait until the horse has been warmed up by gentle exercise. Never put up a horse brought in a heated condition to the stable or picket line, but throw a blanket over him and...
Page 35 - For light, quick draught, a formation intermediate between the two is the proper one; the large frame of the cart-horse being too heavy for the legs to bear at a fast pace, and leading to their rapid destruction in trotting over our modern hard roads. The capacity of the lungs is marked by the size of the chest at the girth; but the stamina will depend upon the depth of the back ribs, which should be especially attended to. A SHORT BACK, with plenty of ground covered nevertheless, is the desideratum...
Page 262 - Grooming is essential to the general health and condition of the domesticated horse. Horses improperly groomed, with ragged manes, unkempt pasterns, and feet improperly looked after, are an indication of an inefficient organization. Clean horses properly...
Page 130 - ... is very likely to make a hole in the horse's back. Which part of the horse's back it should be fitted to has been " dimly shadowed forth'" in Chapter I., but shall be more clearly and accurately determined in the course of this present one. As regards size or extent of surface the meaning is, that the greater this is with a given weight, the less will be the pressure on any given point, and consequently the less risk of sore back, provided always that the pressure be equally distributed over...
Page 359 - ... suitable kinds ? Many observations and some experiments in this direction have already been made, and if proper research is continued, and sufficiently thorough experiments are followed up, there is no reason to doubt that proper kinds will be found for successful cultivation in all parts of the country. The plains lying west of the one hundredth meridian, together with much broken and mountainous interior country, nearly treeless and arid, in New Mexico, western Texas, and Arizona, are unreliable...
Page 211 - This, therefore, is the measure of destruction of horses during the same period. During the eight months of the year 1864 the cavalry of the Army of the Potomac was supplied with two remounts, nearly 40,000 horses. The supply of fresh horses to the army of Gen. Sheridan during his campaign in the valley of the Shenandoah has been at the rate of 150 per day.
Page 266 - Before entering a stall, speak to the horse gently and then go in quietly. Never take a rapid gait until the horse has been warmed up by gentle exercise. Never put up a horse brought in a heated condition to the stable or picket line, but throw a blanket over him and rub his legs, or walk him until cool. When he is wet, put him under shelter, and wisp him until dry. Never feed grain to a horse nor allow him to stand uncovered when heated. Hay will not hurt a horse, no matter how warm he may be. Never...
Page 404 - ... permanent noisy respiration, but after all other causes are enumerated it will be found that more than nine out of ten cases of chronic roaring are caused by paralysis of the muscles of the larynx ; and almost invariably it is the muscles of the left side of the larynx that are affected. In chronic roaring the noise is made when the air is drawn into the lungs; and only when the disease is far advanced is a sound produced when the air is expelled, and even then it is not near so loud as during...
Page 369 - This is the commonest and best grass in the far West; it grows in small, roundish patches, the foliage being in a dense cushion, like moss; the flowering stalks seldom rise over a foot in height, and bear near the top one or two spikes each about an inch long, standing out at right angles; when much grazed these spikes are eaten off and only the mats of leaves are observable; it is highly nutritious, and stock of all kinds prefer it to any grass growing with it; it dries and cures on the ground so...
Page 225 - Tradition says it was Ľonca sorrel, but now it is white from age. The Quartermaster's Department will be chargeable with ingratitude if that mule is sold, or the maintenance of it thrown on the charitable officers of the post. I advise it to be kept in the department, fed and maintained until death. I think tne mule was at Fort Morgan, Mobile Point, when I was there in 1842.

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