The Unity of the Odyssey (Google eBook)

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Univ of Massachusetts Press, 1989 - Literary Criticism - 343 pages
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Dimock proceeds Book by Homeric Book. At times he retells the epic tale. At others he dwells on this or that thematic highlight or difficulty. He draws on etymology, especially with reference to the names of the characters. It is the 'pain' which he hears out of the many-minded and much test Odysseus which gives the twenty-four Books their axis. But each angle of comprehension, each phiological and critical move is meant to demonstrate the unwavering coherence of the epic, the perfect appositeness of every episode, detail, seeming digression to the underlying design of the homecoming and of the restoration to Ithaea of justice, of a justice precisely tempered, ripened by pain. - George Steiner. (London). Time Literary Supplement.
  

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User Review  - Jamey - Goodreads

Great book on the Odyssey. If you only read one book of Homer criticism on the Odyssey.... Read full review

Contents

INTRODUCTION
3
The Image of Odysseus
5
Right and Wrong
25
Nestor the HomeGoer
38
The Waiting of Menelaos Penelope and the Suitors
46
Odysseus Unveiled
63
The Maiden Unmastered
76
The Happy City
83
Eumaios the Faithful Slave
189
The Return of Telemachos
199
Father and Son
207
Beggar on the Threshold
216
Afternoon to Evening
232
The Man of Pain
246
A Sweet Dinner
264
Odysseus Strings His Bow
277

The City Sacker
94
The Kyklops
107
Kirke
119
The Dead
133
Helios
162
Athena and Odysseus
175
Justice
295
Penelope
316
Peace
323
WORKS CITED
337
INDEX
339
Copyright

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Page 6 - Tell me now, you Muses who have your homes on Olympos. For you, who are goddesses, are there, and you know all things, and we have heard only the rumour of it and know nothing.
Page 18 - ... Odysseus) is dead and no longer living, then return to your own native land, and heap up a grave mound for him, and perform funeral rites, a great many as it is fitting, and give your mother in marriage to a husband. But when you have accomplished these things and brought them about, then consider in your mind and heart, how you may kill the Suitors in your house, by stealth, or openly.'1 This suggestion by Athene has been criticized as futile and senseless, because the Suitors would of course...

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