Erewhon, or, Over the range [by S. Butler]. (Google eBook)

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1908
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LibraryThing Review

User Review  - OccassionalRead - LibraryThing

Erewhon is an anagram for Nowhere. Butler's novel is a satire of late 19th century England. Erewhon is a kind of Shangri La, a medieval, European-like country, populated by what might be the lost 13th ... Read full review

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - DinadansFriend - LibraryThing

Somewhat redolent of "Gulliver's Travels", and certainly ancestor of a great deal of later Science fiction, one should read this vision of English society viewed through a mythical-kingdom looking glass. You can still find some ripples of this book battering the shores of the Sci-Fi pond! Read full review

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Page 198 - LET the day perish wherein I was born, and the night in which it was said, " There is a man child conceived.
Page 191 - Erewhonians say it was by chance only that the earth and stars and all the heavenly worlds began to roll from east to west, and not from west to east, and in like manner they say it is by chance that man is drawn through life with his face to the past instead of to the future. For the future is there as much as the past, only that we may not see it. Is it not in the loins of the past, and must not the past alter before the future can do so? Sometimes, again, they say that there was a race of men...
Page 198 - For now should I have lain still and been quiet, I should have slept: then had I been at rest...
Page 95 - ... circumstances, he lets it be known to all his friends that he is suffering from a severe fit of immorality, just as we do when we are ill, and they come and visit him with great solicitude, and inquire with interest how it all came about, what symptoms first showed themselves, and so forth, questions which he will answer with perfect Unreserve; for bad conduct, though considered no less deplorable than illness with ourselves, and as unquestionably indicating something seriously wrong with...
Page 325 - To lash the age, to ridicule vain pretension, to expose hypocrisy, to deride humbug in education, politics and religion, are tasks beyond most men's powers ; but occasionally, very occasionally, a bit of genuine satire secures for itself more than a passing nod of recognition. Erewhon is such a satire. . . . The best of its kind since Gulliver's Travels} Augustine Birrell 12.
Page 325 - It drives one almost to despair of English literature when one sees so extraordinary a study of English life as Butler's posthumous ' Way of All Flesh ' making so little impression...
Page 242 - But returning to the argument, I would repeat that I fear none of the existing machines; what I fear is the extraordinary rapidity with which they are becoming something very different to what they are at present. No class of beings have in any time past made so rapid a movement forward. Should not that movement be jealously watched, and checked while we can still check it? And is it not necessary for this end to destroy the more advanced of the machines which are in use at present, though it is...
Page 237 - But who can say that the vapour engine has not a kind of consciousness? Where does consciousness begin, and where end? Who can draw the line? Who can draw any line? Is not everything interwoven with everything? Is not machinery linked with animal life in an infinite variety of ways? The shell of a hen's egg is made of a delicate white ware and is a machine as much as an egg-cup is; the shell is a device for holding the egg as much as the egg-cup for holding the shell: both are phases of the same...
Page 116 - ... and their intimate acquaintance with all family secrets would give them a power, both social and political, which nothing could resist. The head of the household would become subordinate to the family doctor, who would interfere between man and wife, between master and servant, until the doctors should be the only depositaries of power in the nation, and have all that we hold precious at their mercy. A time of universal dephysicalization would ensue; medicinevendors of all kinds would abound...
Page 113 - I must condense it somewhat, and nothing which I could say would give more than a faint idea of the solemn, not to say majestic, severity with which it was delivered. The sentence was as follows : " Prisoner at the bar, you have been accused of the great crime of labouring under pulmonary consumption, and after an impartial trial before a jury of your countrymen, you have been found guilty. Against the justice of the verdict I can say nothing : the evidence against you was conclusive, and it...

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