Orations & Essays of Edward John Phelps: Diplomat and Statesman (Google eBook)

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Harper & Brothers, 1901 - Law - 475 pages
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Page 464 - Rest unto our souls." —Rest unto our souls! — 'tis all we want, — the end of all our wishes and pursuits : give us a prospect of this, we take the wings of the morning, and fly to the uttermost parts of the earth...
Page 230 - if thou well observe The rule of not too much, by temperance taught, In what thou eat'st and drink'st, seeking from thence Due nourishment, not gluttonous delight, Till many years over thy head return : So mayst thou live, till like ripe fruit thou drop Into thy mother's lap, or be with ease Gathered, not harshly plucked, for death mature...
Page 239 - States are involved, that the American continents, by the free and independent condition which they have assumed and maintain, are henceforth not to be considered as subjects for future colonization by any European powers.
Page 17 - That all men are born equally free and independent, and have certain natural, inherent and unalienable rights; amongst which are the enjoying and defending life and liberty, acquiring, possessing and protecting property, and pursuing and obtaining happiness and safety...
Page 18 - As every freeman, to preserve his independence, (if he has not a sufficient estate,) ought to have some profession, calling, trade, or farm, whereby he may honestly subsist, there can be no necessity for, nor use in establishing offices of profit ; the usual effects of which are dependence and servility, unbecoming freemen, in the possessors and expectants ; faction, contention, corruption, and disorder among the people. Wherefore, whenever an office, through increase of fees or otherwise, becomes...
Page 65 - No man shall be deprived of his life, liberty or property, but by the judgment of his peers and the law of the land.
Page 299 - ... for crime; that no bill of attainder or ex post facto law shall be passed; that no law shall be passed abridging the freedom of speech or of the press or...
Page 304 - The judicial power is vested in one Supreme Court and in such inferior courts as Congress may from time to time establish.
Page 44 - Though his authority as Chief Justice of the United States was protracted far beyond the ordinary term of public life, no man dared to covet his place, or express a wish to see it filled by another. Even the spirit of party respected the unsullied purity of the judge, and the fame of the chief justice has justified the wisdom of the Constitution and reconciled the jealousy of freedom to the independence of the judiciary...
Page 86 - We'll bury him; and then, what's brave, what's noble, Let's do it after the high Roman fashion, And make Death proud to take us. Come, away; This case of that huge spirit now is cold. Ah, women, women! come; we have no friend But resolution, and the briefest end.

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