The Promise of American Life (Google eBook)

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Macmillan, 1909 - United States - 468 pages
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User Review  - Caterina - Goodreads

Good book, but very interesting to see the underlying racism of the author expressed Read full review

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Page 11 - a morsel of bread, now fat and frolicsome, gladly help their father to clear those fields, whence exuberant crops are to arise to feed them all ; without any part being claimed either by a despotic prince, a rich
Page 98 - average Western American of Lincoln's generation was 'fundamentally a man who subordinated his intelligence to certain dominant practical interests and purposes. He was far from being a stupid or slow-witted man/,. On the contrary, his wits had been sharpened by the traffic of American politics and business, and his mind was shrewd, flexible, and
Page 472 - heroic proportions in his own person, but by the sincere and enthusiastic imitation of heroes and saints, and whether or. not he will ever come to such imitation will depend upon the ability of his exceptional fellow-countrymen to offer him acceptable examples of heroism and saintliness.
Page 101 - this discipline had failed to pervert his character, narrow his sympathies, or undermine his purposes. His intelligence served to enlighten his will, and his will, to establish the mature decisions of his intelligence. Late in life the two faculties became in their exercise almost indistinguishable. His judgments, in so far as they were decisive,
Page 11 - great changes in the world. Here the rewards of his industry/ follow with equal steps the progress of his labor; this labor
Page 128 - legislative specialists. The effect was precisely -the opposite. They afforded the political specialist a wonderful opportunity. The ordinary American could not pretend to give as much time to politics as the smooth operation of this complicated machine demanded; and little by little there emerged in different parts of | - the country a class of politicians who spent all their time in
Page 472 - to grow general mankind must be notably transformed. If a noble and civilized democracy is to subsist, the common citizen must be something of a saint and something of a hero,
Page 11 - self-interest; can it want a stronger allure/ ment? Wives and children, who before in vain demanded a morsel of bread, now fat and frolicsome, gladly help their father to clear those fields, whence exuberant crops are to arise to feed them all ; without any part being claimed either by a despotic prince, a rich
Page 472 - if a few hundred years from now it seems less ominous, the threat will be removed in only one way. The common citizen can become something of a saint and something of a hero, not by growing to
Page 72 - It is no wonder, consequently, that the pioneer Democracy viewed with distrust and aversion the man with a special vocation and high standards of achievement. Such a man did insist upon being in certain respects better than the average; and under the prevalent

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