Genealogy of the Roberdeau Family: Including a Biography of General Daniel Roberdeau, of the Revolutionary Army, and the Continental Congress; and Signer of the Articles of Confederation (Google eBook)

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J. L. Pearson, printer, 1876 - 196 pages
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Page 117 - But, soft! what light through yonder window breaks! It is the east, and Juliet is the sun ! Arise, fair sun, and kill the envious moon, Who is already sick and pale with grief, That thou her maid art far more fair than she...
Page 152 - Lynn, received a commission as justice of the peace, was nine times elected as a representative, and in 1788 was a member of the Convention to ratify the Constitution of the United States. He was an active and useful citizen.
Page 62 - May, 1776, to recommend to the respective assemblies and conventions of the United Colonies, where no government sufficient to the exigencies of their affairs...
Page 84 - The tax that has been laid upon us by monopolizers and forestallers within these six months past for it may justly be called a tax amounts to...
Page 80 - I intend to build such a fort as, with sufficient provisions, under the smile of Providence, would enable me to defend it against any number of Indians that might presume to invest it. If I am not prevented, by an opportunity of serving the State eminently by a longer stay in the wilderness, I purpose to return to my duty in Congress in about three weeks. Will Council favor me with the exemption of a number of men, not exceeding twenty, if I cannot be supplied by the adjutantgeneral, who has...
Page 86 - I had money enough," says one anonymous writer, " some time ago, to buy a hogshead of sugar. I sold it again, and got a great deal more money than it cost me ; yet what I sold it for, when I went to market it again, would buy but a tierce. I sold that, too, for a great deal of profit, yet the whole of what I sold it for would afterwards buy but a barrel. I have now more money than I ever had, and yet I am not so rich as when I had less.
Page 75 - M'Kean, Mr. Stone, Mr. Nelson, Mr. Hewes, Mr. E. Rutledge, and Mr. Gwinnett. Upon the report of this committee, the subject was, from time to time, debated, until the 15th of November, 1777, when a copy of the confederation being made out, and sundry amendments made in the diction, without altering the sense, the same was finally agreed to. Congress, at the same time, directed that the articles should be proposed to the legislatures of all the United States, to be considered, and if approved of by...
Page 62 - ... had the dangerous tendency to withdraw this province from that happy union with the other colonies which we consider both our glory and our protection.
Page 30 - ... should be paid, out of the Scotch estate; and also such costs and damages as she had been put to, or sustained, or should sustain, by any action or suits brought by the creditors relating thereto, to be settled by the Master, and also the arrears of her annuity ; the defendants to pay accordingly. And out of the rents, profits, and produce of the said plantation estate, the plaintiff was to be paid her annuity in future. The testator's creditors, annuitants, and legatees to come in and prove...
Page 138 - M'Kean returned to Philadelphia, and was present in Congress on the 2d of August, when the engrossed copy of the Declaration of Independence was signed by the members. A few days after this, receiving intelligence of his being elected a member of the Convention in Delaware, assembled for the purpose of forming a constitution for that state, he departed for Dover. Although excessively fatigued on his arrival, at the request of a committee of gentlemen of the Convention, he retired to his room in the...

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