Writing for Science and Engineering: Papers, Presentations and Reports: Papers, Presentations and Reports (Google eBook)

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Butterworth-Heinemann, Oct 11, 2000 - Business & Economics - 281 pages
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Are you a post-graduate student in Engineering, Science or Technology who needs to know how to:

Prepare abstracts, theses and journal papers
Present your work orally
Present a progress report to your funding body

Would you like some guidance aimed specifically at your subject area? ... This is the book for you; a practical guide to all aspects of post-graduate documentation for Engineering, Science and Technology students, which will prove indispensable to readers.

Writing for Science and Engineering will prove invaluable in all areas of research and writing due its clear, concise style. The practical advice contained within the pages alongside numerous examples to aid learning will make the preparation of documentation much easier for all students.

  

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Contents

Chapter 3 AbstractSummaryExecutive summary
64
Chapter 4 A literature review
78
Chapter 5 A research proposal
92
Chapter 6 A journal paper
99
Chapter 7 Progress reports
107
Chapter 8 Consulting or Management report and Recommendation report
113
Chapter 9 Engineering design report
118
Chapter 10 A formal letter
123
Chapter 14 Referencing
167
Chapter 15 Editorial conventions
189
strategies
199
Chapter 17 Problems of style
209
Chapter 18 A seminar or conference presentation
235
Chapter 19 Presentation to a small group
263
Appendix 1 SI units
268
Appendix 2 The parts of speech and verb forms
271

Chapter 11 Emails faxes and memos
134
Chapter 12 A thesis
141
Chapter 13 A conference poster
151
Appendix 3 Style manuals for specific disciplines
274
Index
275
Copyright

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Page 7 - only the level 1 headings, you can check the overall structure of the document in terms of only its main headings. By progressively displaying greater levels of subheadings, you can obtain an increasingly more detailed view of the structure of the document. This also helps in revising the first draft of the document.
Page 25 - List of Illustrations, list all the figures first, and then list all the tables. List the number, title and page of each illustration. Place the List of Illustrations immediately after the Table of Contents. If both of them are brief, put them on the same page with the Table of Contents first.

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