The History of Witchcraft and Demonology (Google eBook)

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Courier Dover Publications, Mar 7, 2012 - Body, Mind & Spirit - 384 pages
12 Reviews
Vividly detailed and highly readable, this classic history of witchcraft and demonology provides a thorough exploration of sorcery, Satanism, and every variety of the black arts. Reflecting popular folklore and theological opinions of the late medieval and early Renaissance periods, this survey of necromancy traces witchcraft from ancient times to the twentieth century, describing the link between heresy and the occult. Threaded with dramatic accounts of witch trials and devil's pacts, this time-tested reference offers a compelling look at The Worship of the Witch, Demons and Familiars, the Sabbat, and Diabolic Possession and Modern Spiritism. It also offers fascinating insight into the role of the Witch in Dramatic Literature.
A prolific occult historian, Montague Summers wrote numerous books, and he edited and translated such important early demonology and witchcraft texts as the Malleus Maleficarum. An intriguing perspective on the development of the black arts and their heretical interpretations by society, church, and state, The History of Witchcraft and Demonology will capture the attention of the general reader as well as the occult enthusiast. Eight meticulously reproduced illustrations from the original publication are included in this unabridged edition.
  

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Review: The History of Witchcraft and Demonology

User Review  - Aaron Meyer - Goodreads

A decent history of Witchcraft, not the modern variant but the medieval. Read full review

Review: The History of Witchcraft and Demonology

User Review  - Clifford Gayo - Goodreads

A BRIEF HISTORY OF WITCHCRAFT AND DEMONOLOGY WHICH IS GOOD TO READ AND UNDERSTAND! Read full review

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About the author (2012)

Heinrich Kramer ( 1430-1505) also known under the Latinized name Henricus Institoris, was a German churchman and inquisitor. Born in Selestat, Alsace, he joined the Dominican Order at an early age and while still a young man was appointed Prior of the Dominican house of his native town. At some date before 1474 he was appointed Inquisitor for the Tyrol, Salzburg, Bohemia and Moravia. His eloquence in the pulpit and tireless activity received recognition at Rome and he was the right-hand man of the Archbishop of Salzburg. By the time of the Bull Summis desiderantes of Pope Innocent VIII in 1484 he was already associated with Jacob Sprenger to make an inquisition for witches and sorcerers. In 1485 he drew up a treatise on witchcraft which was incorporated in the Malleus Maleficarum (literally "The hammer of malefactresses (wrongdoing women - i.e. witches)"). Kramer failed in his attempt to obtain endorsement for this work from the top theologians of the Inquisition at the Faculty of Cologne, and they condemned the book as recommending unethical and illegal procedures, as well as being inconsistent with Catholic doctrines of demonology. Kramer's claimed endorsement from four of the professors may have been forged. He was denounced by the Inquisition in 1490. In 1495 he was summoned to Venice to give public lectures, which were very popular. In 1500 he was empowered to proceed against the Waldensians and Picards. He died in Bohemia in 1505.

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