Instruction in Faith (1537)

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Westminster John Knox Press, 1949 - Religion - 93 pages
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This translation of Calvin's enlightening book includes the essentials of his position on how one should think and live as a Christian. Keeping Calvin's intentions for a clear and simple text in mind, Paul Fugrmann presents an edition that has value for people who have a scholarly interest in the Reformed tradition and for lay readers who wish to clarify and strengthen their own faith.

  

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Fundamental to Sovereign Grace Theology

User Review  - James - Christianbook.com

This work of John Calvin is an excellent summary of Christian Theology in general and the Doctrines of Grace (Reformed) Theology in particular. Calvin was only 28 when he wrote this work and it was at ... Read full review

Contents

Foreword to the 1992 Edition
9
Historical Foreword
15
All Men Are Born in Order to Know God
21
What We Must Know of God
23
Man
24
Free Will
25
Sin and Death
26
How We Are Delivered and Restored to Life
27
Repentance and Regeneration
44
How the Righteousness Through Good Deeds and the Righteousness Through Faith Fit and Harmonize Together
45
The Symbol of the Faith
46
What Hope Is
55
Prayer
56
Exposition of the Lords Prayer
58
Perseverance in Prayer
64
The Sacraments
65

The Law of the Lord
28
The Summary of the Law
35
The Law Is a Preparation to Come to Christ
36
We Apprehend Christ Through Faith
37
Election and Predestination
38
What True Faith Is
39
Faith Is a Gift of God
40
We Are Justified in Christ Through Faith
41
We Are Sanctified Through Faith in Order to Obey the Law
42
What the Sacrament is
66
The Supper of the Lord
68
The Pastors of the Church and Their Power
69
Human Traditions
71
Excommunication
72
The Magistrate or Civic Officer
73
Notes
77
Copyright

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About the author (1949)

Born Jean Cauvin in Noyon, Picardy, France, John Calvin was only a boy when Martin Luther first raised his challenge concerning indulgences. Calvin was enrolled at the age of 14 at the University of Paris, where he received preliminary training in theology and became an elegant Latinist. However, following the dictates of his father, he left Paris at the age of 19 and went to study law, first at Orleans, then at Bourges, in both of which centers the ideas of Luther were already creating a stir. On his father's death, Calvin returned to Paris, began to study Greek, the language of the New Testament, and decided to devote his life to scholarship. In 1532 he published a commentary on Seneca's De Clementia, but the following year, after experiencing what was considered a sudden conversion, he was forced to flee Paris for his religious views. The next year was given to the study of Hebrew in Basel and to writing the first version of his famous Institutes of the Christian Religion, which he gave to the printer in 1535. The rest of his life-except for a forced exile of three years-he spent in Geneva, where he became chief pastor, without ever being ordained. When he died, the city was solidly on his side, having almost become what one critic called a "theocracy." By then the fourth and much-revised edition of his Institutes had been published in Latin and French, commentaries had appeared on almost the whole Bible, treatises had been written on the Lord's Supper, on the Anabaptists, and on secret Protestants under persecution in France. Thousands of refugees had come to Geneva, and the city-energized by religious fervor-had found room and work for them. Though Calvin was sometimes bitter in his denunciation of those who disagreed with him, intolerant of other points of view, and absolutely sure he was right on the matter of predestination, he was nonetheless one of the great expounders of the faith. From his work the Reformed tradition had its genesis, and from his genius continues to refresh itself.

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