The Cambridge Companion to Eighteenth-Century Poetry

Front Cover
John Sitter
Cambridge University Press, Mar 26, 2001 - Literary Criticism - 298 pages
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This volume analyzes major premises, preoccupations, and practices of a wide range of English poets writing from 1700 to the 1790s, including Pope and Thomson, Anna Seward and Erasmus Darwin. Specially commissioned essays by leading scholars avoid familiar categories and single-author approaches to consider such large poetic themes as nature, the city, political passions, the relation of death to desire and dreams, the rise of a national tradition, appeals to an imagined future, and the meanings of "sensibility." The essays are supported by a chronology and guides to further reading.
  

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Contents

Introduction the future of eighteenthcentury poetry
1
Couplets and conversation
11
Political passions
37
Publishing and reading poetry
63
The city in eighteenthcentury poetry
83
Nature poetry
109
Questions in poetics why and how poetry matters
133
Eighteenthcentury women poets and readers
157
Creating a national poetry the tradition of Spenser and Milton
177
The return to the ode
203
A poetry of absence
225
The poetry of sensibility
249
PreRomanticism and the ends of eighteenthcentury poetry
271
Index
291
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