Agile Management for Software Engineering: Applying the Theory of Constraints for Business Results (Google eBook)

Front Cover
Prentice Hall Professional, Sep 17, 2003 - Computers - 336 pages
8 Reviews

A breakthrough approach to managing agile software development, Agile methods might just be the alternative to outsourcing. However, agile development must scale in scope and discipline to be acceptable in the boardrooms of the Fortune 1000. In Agile Management for Software Engineering, David J. Anderson shows managers how to apply management science to gain the full business benefits of agility through application of the focused approach taught by Eli Goldratt in his Theory of Constraints.

Whether you're using XP, Scrum, FDD, or another agile approach, you'll learn how to develop management discipline for all phases of the engineering process, implement realistic financial and production metrics, and focus on building software that delivers maximum customer value and outstanding business results.Coverage includes:

  • Making the business case for agile methods: practical tools and disciplines
  • How to choose an agile method for your next project
  • Breakthrough application of Critical Chain Project Management and constraint-driven control of the flow of value
  • Defines the four new roles for the agile manager in software projects—and competitive IT organizations

Whether you're a development manager, project manager, team leader, or senior IT executive, this book will help you achieve all four of your most urgent challenges: lower cost, faster delivery, improved quality, and focused alignment with the business.

  

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Libro sobre adminstracion de desarrollo

Review: Agile Management for Software Engineering: Applying the Theory of Constraints for Business Results

User Review  - Collin Rogowski - Goodreads

Very thorough book about applying the theory of constraints to agile processes. It's becoming a bit dated (which shows eg in the choice of agile process presented), but everything in it is still valid ... Read full review

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About the author (2003)

DAVID J. ANDERSON has been in the software business for more than 20 years, with experience as a developer and manager in start-up environments and in three of the world's largest companies. He was a member of the team that created Feature Driven Development. David is currently Director of Emerging Technology with 4thpass Inc., a Motorola subsidiary based in Seattle, WA.

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