A students' history of Greece (Google eBook)

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Macmillan, 1917 - Greece - 377 pages
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Contents

The Dorian Migration
29
Homer
31
Political and Social Organization of the Early Greeks
34
Pall of Greek Monarchies and Rise of the Republics
38
Phoenician Intercourse with Greece
39
CHAPTER III
42
Colonies on the Coasts of the Euxine lropontis and North ALgean
44
Colonies in the Western Mediterranean
46
Growth of Trade and Maritime Enterprise
54
Influence of Lydia on Greece
58
The Opening of Egypt and Foundation of Cyrene
60
Popular Discontent in Greece
61
CHAPTER IV
64
Spartan Conquest of Messenia
68
Internal Development of Sparta and her Institutions
71
The Supremacy and Decline of Argos The Olympian Games
75
Changes in Law Democratic Movements
78
Tyrants
79
Tyrants at Corinth
81
Tyrants of Megara
83
Tyrants at Sicyon
84
The Sacred War The Panhellenic Games
85
CHAPTER V
90
Foundation of the Athenian Commonwealth
91
The Aristocracy in the Seventh Century
93
The Timocracy
94
The Conspiracy of Cylon
96
The Legislation of Solon
97
The Constitutional Reforms of Solon and the Foundations of Democracy
99
Effects of the Legislation of Solon
101
CHAPTER VI
103
Athens under Pisistratus
104
Growth of Sparta and the Peloponnesian League
109
Fall of the Pisistratids and Intervention of Sparta
111
Reform of Cleisthenes
114
First Victories of the Democracy
117
CHAPTER VII
119
The Persian Conquest of Asiatic Greece and Egypt
122
The First Years of Darius Conquest of Thrace
123
The Ionic Revolt against Persia
126
Second and Third Expeditions of Darius
129
The Battle of Marathon Miltiades
130
Struggle of Athens and igina
134
Growth of the Athenian Democracy
135
Athens becomes a SeaPower Themistocles
136
CHAPTER VIII
139
Preparations of Greece
140
Battle of Artemisium
142
Battle of Thermopylae
144
The Persian Advance The Capture of Athens
146
The Battle of Salamis
147
Consequences of Salamis
150
The Battle of Plataea
153
Gelon Tyrant of Syracuse
154
Syracuse under Hieron
156
CHAPTER IX
159
The Confederacy of Delos
161
The Fortification of Athens and the Piraeus
163
Ostracism and Death of Themistocles
165
Successful Campaigns of the Confederacy of Delos
166
The Confederacy of Delos becomes an Athenian Empire
167
Policy and Ostracism of Cimon
169
CHAPTER X
172
War of Athens with the Peloponnesians
175
War with Egypt
176
War in Boeotia
177
The Athenian Empire at its Height
179
Conclusion of Peace with Persia
180
Athenian Reverses The Thirty Years Peace
181
CHAPTER XI
183
The Restoration of the Temples
185
Literature
189
Higher Education The Sophists
190
Opposition to Pericles
191
The Revolt of Samos
193
CHAPTER XII
195
Sparta decides upon War
196
Athenian Expedition to Boeotia Delium
210
The War in Thrace Athens loses Amphipolis Brasidas
212
Negotiations for Peace
213
ART MCE 14 Battle of Amphipolis
214
CHAPTER XIII
217
First Operations in Sicily
219
The Sicilian Expedition
220
Treachery of Alcibiades
222
Spartan Intervention
223
The Defeat of the Athenians
224
CHAPTER XIV
227
Fall of the Four Hundred The Democracy Restored
228
The Restored Democracy Cyzicus
230
Cyrus and Lysander
231
The Battle of Egospotami
233
The Surrender of Athens
234
Rule of the Thirty
236
Overthrow of the Thirty Restoration of the Democracy
238
Literature of the Period
239
CHAPTER XV
241
War of Sparta with Persia Agesilaus
244
Spartan Aggression Death of Lysander
245
ART PAGE 5 The Corinthian War
247
The Kings Peace
248
Highhanded Policy of Sparta
249
Alliance of Athens and Thebes
251
Theban Reforms Epaminondas
253
The Battle of Naxos and the Peace of Callias
254
Literature and Art
256
Athens under the Restored Democracy
261
CHAPTER XVI
264
Policy of Thebes in Southern Greece Arcadia and Messenia
267
Foundation of Messene Alliance of Athens and Sparta
269
Confusion on the Peloponnesus
270
War between Athens and Thebes
271
War on the Peloponnesus Battle of Olympia
272
Battle of Mantinea The Death of Epaminondas
273
CHAPTER XVII
276
Rise of Dionysius
277
Tyranny of Dionysius
278
Punic Wars of Dionysius
279
The Empire of Dionysius His Death
280
Dionysius the Younger and Dion
283
Timoleon
285
CHAPTER XVIII
287
Early Conquests of Philip II of Macedonia
288
ART PAGB 3 The Organization of the Macedonian Army
290
Mausolus of Caria
291
Phocis and the Sacred War
292
Intervention of Philip of Macedonia
294
Aims of Philip
295
Demosthenes
296
The Advance of Macedonia Fall of Olynthus
297
The Peace of Philocrates
299
Philip in Greece
300
Interval of Peace and Preparations for War
301
March of Philip Alliance of Athens and Thebes
303
Battle of Chseronea
304
The Congress of the Greeks
305
Death of Philip
307
CHAPTER XIX
310
Preparations for Alexanders Persian Expedition Condition of Persia
313
Battle of Issus
320
Conquest of Syria
323
Conquest of Egypt
328
Battle of Gaugamela and Conquest of Babylonia
329
Conquest of Susiana and Persis
333
Death of Darius
334
Spirit of Alexanders Policy as Lord of Asia
337
CHAPTER XX
339
The Conquest of India
347
Alexanders Return to Babylon
358
Preparations for an Arabian Expedition Alexanders Death
361
Greece under Macedonia
363
The Episode of Harpalus and the Greek Revolt
365
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Page 53 - Reverse : incuse, back of these figures, veniently include Locri in the Achaean group. Thus the southern coast of Italy would have been almost a homogeneous circle if a Dorian colony had not been established in a small sheltered bay at the extreme north point of the gulf to which it gave the name it still bears, Taras or Tarcntum.
Page 249 - King Artaxerxes thinks it just that the cities in Asia and the islands of Clazomenae and Cyprus should belong to him. He also thinks it just to leave all the other Grecian cities, both small and great, independent, except Lemnos, Imbros, and Scyros, which are to belong to Athens, as of old.
Page 258 - Anytus, the honest democratic politician who had been prominent in the restoration of the democracy, came forward, with some others, as a champion of the state religion, and accused Socrates of impiety. The accusation ran : " Socrates is guilty of crime, because he does not believe in the gods recognised by the city, but introduces strange supernatural beings ; he is also guilty, because he corrupts the youth.
Page 197 - And you have never considered what manner of men are these Athenians with whom you will have to fight, and how utterly unlike yourselves. They are revolutionary, equally quick in the conception and in the execution of every new plan; while you are conservative careful only to keep what you have, originating nothing, and not acting even when action is most necessary.
Page 34 - When we first meet the Greeks, they live together in family communities. Their villages are habitations of a genos; that is, of a clan, or family in a wide sense, all the members being descended from a common ancestor and bound together by the tie of blood.
Page 323 - Thou hast only to come to me to ask and receive thy mother and wife and children, and whatever else thou mayest desire. And for the future, whenever thou sendest, send to me as to the Great King of Asia, and do not write as to an equal, but tell me whatever thy need be, as to one who is lord of all that is Greeh intrigues with the Persian hing.
Page 316 - Persian panoplies to Athens, as an offering to Athena on the Acropolis, with this dedication : " Alexander, son of Philip, and the Greeks (except the Lacedaemonians), from the barbarians of Asia.
Page 20 - A History Syllabus for Secondary Schools, prepared by a special committee, of the New England History Teachers...
Page 197 - This answer will be just, and befits the dignity of the city. We must be aware however that war will come; and the more willing we are to accept the situation, the less ready will our enemies be to lay hands upon us.
Page 56 - Fifty days after the solstice (34), when the season of wearisome heat is come to an end, is the right time for me to go sailing. Then you will not wreck your ship, nor will the sea destroy the sailors, unless Poseidon the Earth-Shaker be set upon it, or Zeus, the king of the deathless gods, wish to slay them; for the issues of good and evil alike are with them.

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