The daybooks of Edward Weston

Front Cover
Aperture, 1990 - Photography - 512 pages
4 Reviews
For more than fifteen years, Edward Weston kept a diary in which he recorded his struggle to understand himself, his society, and his medium. Seldom has an artist written about his life as vividly, intimately, or sensitively. His journal has become a classic of photographic literature.

A towering figure in twentieth-century photography, Weston sought to awaken human vision. His restless quest for beauty and the mystical presence behind it created a body of work unrivaled in the medium. For more than fifteen years, Edward Weston kept a diary in which he recorded his struggle to understand himself, his society, and his medium. Seldom has an artist written about his life as vividly, intimately, or sensitively. His journal has become a classic of photographic literature.

A towering figure in twentieth-century photography, Weston sought to awaken human vision. His restless quest for beauty and the mystical presence behind it created a body of work unrivaled in the medium.

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Review: The Daybooks of Edward Weston; Two Volumes in One: I. Mexico, II. California

User Review  - David Lewane - Goodreads

The master. Read full review

Review: The Daybooks of Edward Weston: Two Volumes in One I. Mexico II. California

User Review  - Brittany Lentz - Goodreads

Definitely recommend for serious photographers. This was an incredible insight into Edward Weston's mind. Love that his journals are our there for us to read. I definitely laughed pretty hard through ... Read full review

Contents

Discussion on Definition April 1923
9
Guadalupe Marín de Rivera 1924
26
Pirámide del Sol 1923
27
Copyright

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About the author (1990)

Edward Weston (1886-1958) is one of the twentieth century's most prominent and pioneering photographers. In 1917 he became a member of the London Salon and in 1922 he met Alfred Stieglitz and Paul Strand.

In 1923 with his marriage failing he went to Mexico and opened a studio. It is at this time that he began keeping journals which he referred to as "daybooks." He wrote in his daybooks until 1943, and in 1961 they were edited by Nancy Newhall and published for the first time.

He was the first photographer to receive a Guggenheim Fellowship. Sadly, he was stricken with Parkinson's disease in the early 1940s and he relied on his sons, Brett and Cole, to continue printing for him. Cole, his youngest son became his assistant in 1946 and in 1952 the two men put together their father's 50th Anniversary Folio. After Edward's death in 1958 Cole fulfilled his father's wish and continued to print his negatives.

Nancy Newhall (1908-1974) dedicated thirty years of her life to photography, as a writer, scholar, critic, editor, and collaborator in publishing the work of several of the most influential photographers of this century.

Among her many accomplishments are the highly acclaimed exhibitions of Paul Strand and Edward Wilson, which she directed at the Museum of Modern Art. Author of the classic biography of Ansel Adams, The Eloquent Light, she also edited and collaborated with Paul Strand to produce the book Time in New England. Her other books include P.H. Emerson: The Fight for Photography as a Fine Art; Edward Wilson: The Flame of Recognition, (ed); and This Is the American Earth (with Ansel Adams).

Beaumont Newhall (1908-1993) was a distinguished historian and curator, and author of the definitive The History of Photography.

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