The Leviathan

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Kessinger Publishing, Jun 1, 2004 - Philosophy - 308 pages
182 Reviews
This scarce antiquarian book is a selection from Kessinger Publishings Legacy Reprint Series. Due to its age, it may contain imperfections such as marks, notations, marginalia and flawed pages. Because we believe this work is culturally important, we have made it available as part of our commitment to protecting, preserving, and promoting the worlds literature. Kessinger Publishing is the place to find hundreds of thousands of rare and hard-to-find books with something of interest for everyone!

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It was hard to read wish to read it again. - Goodreads
Most random and irritating writer on philosophy ever. - Goodreads
Hobbes' prose is nasty brutish and long. - Goodreads
A real page turner!!! - Goodreads

Review: Leviathan

User Review  - Alex Robertson - Goodreads

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Review: Leviathan

User Review  - Peter J. - Goodreads

I don't agree with several of Hobbes' stances, for example, that the sovereign is god's representative on earth and should not be challenged on what he calls canon, but I did learn a bit during the reading. Read full review

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About the author (2004)

Thomas Hobbes was born in Malmesbury, the son of a wayward country vicar. He was educated at Magdalen Hall, Oxford, and was supported during his long life by the wealthy Cavendish family, the Earls of Devonshire. Traveling widely, he met many of the leading intellectuals of the day, including Francis Bacon, Galileo Galilei, and Rene Descartes. As a philosopher and political theorist, Hobbes established---along with, but independently of, Descartes---early modern modes of thought in reaction to the scholasticism that characterized the seventeenth century. Because of his ideas, he was constantly in dispute with scientists and theologians, and many of his works were banned. His writings on psychology raised the possibility (later realized) that psychology could become a natural science, but his theory of politics is his most enduring achievement. In brief, his theory states that the problem of establishing order in society requires a sovereign to whom people owe loyalty and who in turn has duties toward his or her subjects. His prose masterpiece Leviathan (1651) is regarded as a major contribution to the theory of the state.

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