The Words and Music of Bruce Springsteen (Google eBook)

Front Cover
Greenwood Publishing Group, 2007 - Music - 198 pages
1 Review

Bruce Springsteen's career has been covered many times over, yet many of the complexities and apparent contradictions of his music remain unresolved. Rob Kirkpatrick provides a comprehensive and coherent look at the work of this thoroughly complex and persistently captivating artist. After a brief biographical treatment, Kirkpatrick considers all of Springsteen's significant albums in chronological order. These include "Born to Run, " which was voted the most popular album of all time in a recently published Zagat survey; "Born in the U.S.A., " which sold more than 20 million copies; and "The Rising, " regarded by many as the most poignant artistic reaction to 9/11. In addition to a probing musical analysis, the book offers a guide to Springsteen's lyrical themes and motifs, allowing readers insight into the complicated nature of the artist's underlying concerns, influences, and ideas. Rounding out the volume is a consideration of The Boss's legacy as a songwriter and musician, as well as appendices including a bibliography and a complete discography.

"The Words and Music of Bruce Springsteen" provides a comprehensive and coherent look at the work of a thoroughly complex and persistently captivating artist. Springsteen enjoys a popularity that has transcended generations. His 1975 album "Born to Run" was voted the most popular album of all time in a recently published Zagat survey; his 1984 album "Born in the U.S.A." spawned seven Top Ten singles while selling more than 20 million copies; and his 2002 album "The Rising" was regarded by many critics as the most poignant artistic reaction to 9/11. Springsteen, now in his 50s, has evolved from an over-hyped version of the next Bob Dylan, to the future of rock and roll in the mid-1970s, to a pop culture icon in Reagan America, to a 21st-century populist voice. His career has been covered many times over, yet many of the complexities and apparent contradictions of his music remain unresolved. These include his hard-rock influenced musical background; his movement from themes of rebellion and isolation in his early work to those of a more populist complexion later on; and his contribution in the 1980s to a conservative patriotism--despite his albums' close association with the music and ideas of Woody Guthrie.

After a brief biographical treatment, Kirkpatrick considers all of Springsteen's significant albums in chronological order. In addition to this probing musical analysis, he offers a guide to Springsteen's lyrical themes and motifs, allowing readers a coherent insight into the complicated nature of the artist's underlying concerns, influences, and ideas. Rounding out the volume is a consideration of The Boss's legacy as a songwriter and musician, as well as appendices including a bibliography and a complete discography. In sum, "The Words and Music of Bruce Springsteen" provides a comprehensive and coherent look, previously unavailable in a single volume, at the work of a thoroughly complex and persistently captivating artist.

  

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Contents

Jukebox Graduate
1
Greetings from Asbury Park NJ 1973
2
The FollowUp the Future of Rock n Roll and a Farewell to Asbury Park
19
Thunder Road Revue
31
Running into the Darkness
49
Double Shot
65
A Meanness in This World
81
Nebraska Becomes Electric
93
Human Touch and Lucky Town 1992
122
At the Movies
129
September and Everything After
139
Dust Devils and Dixieland
147
The Seeger Sessions 2006
152
Afterword
157
Discography
163
Notes
169

Bruced Out
109
Tunnel of Love 1987
112
Snake Eyes
119

Common terms and phrases

About the author (2007)

ROB KIRKPATRICK is the author of Cecil Travis of the Washington Senators: The War-Torn Career of an All-Star Shortstop (2005). He provided an essay on the Pacific coast rock music scene for The Greenwood Encyclopedia of American Regional Cultures (2004), contributed to Approaches to Teaching Hamlet (MLA 2001) and has appeared in The Hemingway Review.

Bibliographic information