A Collection of Old Ballads: Corrected from the Best and Most Ancient Copies Extant. With Introductions Historical, Critical, Or Humorous, Volume 1 (Google eBook)

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J. Roberts; and sold, 1723 - Ballads, English
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Page 225 - Did cover them with leaves. And now the heavy wrath of God Upon their uncle fell ; Yea, fearful fiends did haunt his house, . His conscience felt an hell : His barns were fired, his goods consumed, His lands were barren made, His cattle died within the field, And nothing with him stayed.
Page 266 - On whom he placed his chief delight; Her beauty was beyond compare, She was both virtuous and fair. There was a young man living by, Who was so charmed with her eye, That he could never be at rest ; He was by love so much possest.
Page 12 - The like was never scene. Most curiously that bower was built Of stone and timber strong, An hundered and fifty doors Did to this bower belong : And they so cunninglye contriv'd With turnings round about, That none but with a clue of thread, Could enter in or out.
Page 113 - And take your bows with speed: " And now with me, my countrymen, Your courage forth advance; For never was there champion yet, In Scotland or in France, " That ever did on horseback come, But if my hap it were, I durst encounter man for man, With him to break a spear.
Page 222 - But if the children chance to die, Ere they to age should come, Their uncle should possess their wealth; For so the will did run. "Now, brother...
Page 69 - It rains, and it blows, but call for more ale, And lay some more wood on the fire. And now call ye Little John hither to me, For little John is a fine lad, At gambols and juggling, and twenty such tricks, As shall make you both merry and glad.
Page 116 - He had a bow bent in his hand, Made of a trusty tree ; An arrow of a cloth-yard long Up to the head drew he...
Page 222 - The one a fine and pretty boy, Not passing three years old ; The other a girl more young than he, And framed in beauty's mould.
Page 115 - In faith I will thee bring Where thou shalt high advanced be, By James, our Scottish king. " Thy ransom I will freely give, And this report of thee, Thou art the most courageous knight, That ever I did see.
Page 74 - Of bride-cake, and so came away. Now, out, alas ! I had forgotten to tell ye, That marry'd they were with a ring : And so will Nan Knight, or be buried a maiden, And now let us pray for the king...

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