History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Volume 3 (Google eBook)

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C.C. Little and J. Brown, 1844
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Page 429 - Is there a thing beneath the sun That strives with Thee my heart to share ? Ah, tear it thence, and reign alone, The Lord of every motion there ! Then shall my heart from earth be free, When it hath found repose in Thee.
Page 140 - For I think that God hath set forth us the apostles last, as it were appointed to death : for we are made a spectacle unto the world, and to angels, and to men.
Page 374 - Westward the course of empire takes its way; The four first acts already past, A fifth shall close the drama with the day : Time's noblest offspring is the last.
Page 416 - We cannot allow the colonies to check, or discourage in any degree, a traffic so beneficial to the nation.
Page 437 - Has heaven reserved, in pity to the poor, No pathless waste, or undiscovered shore; No secret island in the boundless main? No peaceful desert yet unclaimed by Spain? Quick let us rise, the happy seats explore, And bear oppression's insolence no more.
Page 394 - ... every man who prefers freedom to a life of slavery will bless and honor you as men who have baffled the attempt of tyranny; and by an impartial and uncorrupt verdict, have laid a noble foundation for securing to ourselves, our posterity, and our neighbors that to which nature and the laws of our country have given us a right the liberty both of exposing and opposing arbitrary power (in these parts of the world, at least) by speaking and writing truth.
Page 68 - shouted Wadsworth, adding, as he turned to the governor of New York, "If I am interrupted again, I will make the sun shine through you in a moment.
Page 416 - Negro labor will keep our British colonies in a due subserviency to the interest of their mother country ; for, while our plantations depend only on planting by negroes, our colonies can never prove injurious to British manufactures, never become independent of their kingdom.
Page 214 - Children, as they gamboled on the beach; reapers, as they gathered the harvest; mowers, as they rested from using the scythe mothers, as they busied themselves about the household, were victims to an enemy who disappeared the moment a blow was struck, and who was ever present where a garrison or a family ceased its vigilance.
Page 156 - Those distant nations," said they, " never spare the strangers; their mutual wars fill their borders with bands of warriors; the Great River abounds in monsters, which devour both men and canoes ; the excessive heats occasion death." " I shall gladly lay down my life for the salvation of souls," replied the good father ; and the docile nation joined him in prayer.

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