History of the Ninth Regiment, New Hampshire Volunteers in the War of the Rebellion (Google eBook)

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Edward Oliver Lord
Republican Press Association, 1895 - United States - 932 pages
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Page 164 - Dear Sir: You remember my speaking to you of what I called your over-cautiousness. Are you not over-cautious when you assume that you cannot do what the enemy is constantly doing ? Should you not claim to be at least his equal in prowess, and act upon the claim?
Page 164 - You seem to act as if this applies against you, but cannot apply in your favor. Change positions with the enemy, and think you not he would break your. communication with Richmond within the next twenty-four hours ? You dread his going into Pennsylvania, but if he does so in full force, he gives up his communications to you absolutely, and you have nothing to do but to follow and ruin him. If he does so with less than full force, fall upon and beat what is left behind all the easier.
Page 160 - President directs that you cross the Potomac and give battle to the enemy, or drive him south. Your army must move now, while the roads are good.
Page 68 - Keys' ford on his left and the road between the end of the mountain and the Potomac on his right. He will, as far as practicable, co-operate with General McLaws and General Jackson in intercepting the retreat of the enemy.
Page 68 - General McLaws, with his own division and that of General R. H. Anderson, will follow General Longstreet. On reaching Middletown he will take the route to Harper's Ferry, and by Friday morning possess himself of the Maryland Heights and endeavor to capture the enemy at Harper's Ferry and vicinity.
Page 196 - The courage with which you, in an open field, maintained the contest against an intrenched foe, and the consummate skill and success with which you crossed and recrossed the river in the face of the enemy, show that you possess all the qualities of a great army which will yet give victory to the cause of the country and of popular government.
Page 349 - We have now ended the sixth day of very heavy fighting. The result, to this time, is much in our favor. Our losses have been heavy, as well as those of the enemy. I think the loss of the enemy must be greater. We have taken over five thousand prisoners by battle, while he has taken from us but few, except stragglers. I PROPOSE TO FIGHT IT OUT ON THIS LINE IF IT TAKES ALL SUMMER.
Page 69 - I have all the plans of the rebels, and will catch them in their own trap if my men are equal to the emergency.
Page 102 - We are in the midst of the most terrible battle of the war perhaps, of history. Thus far it looks well, but I have great odds against me.

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