The Monthly Review (Google eBook)

Front Cover
R. Griffiths., 1816
0 Reviews
Editors: May 1749-Sept. 1803, Ralph Griffiths; Oct. 1803-Apr. 1825, G. E. Griffiths.
  

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 438 - Not by the sport of nature, but of man: These two, a maiden and a youth, were there Gazing — the one on all that was beneath Fair as herself — but the boy gazed on her; And both were young, and one was beautiful; And both were young — yet not alike in youth. As the sweet moon on the horizon's verge, The maid was on the eve of womanhood; The boy had fewer summers, but his heart Had far outgrown his years, and to his eye There was but one beloved face on earth, And that was shining on him...
Page 436 - He faded, and so calm and meek, So softly worn, so sweetly weak, So tearless, yet so tender — kind, And grieved for those he left behind; With all the while a cheek whose bloom Was as a mockery of the tomb, Whose tints as gently sunk away As a departing rainbow's ray — An eye of most transparent light, That almost made the dungeon bright...
Page 435 - Twas still some solace, in the dearth Of the pure elements of earth, To hearken to each other's speech, And each turn comforter to each With some new hope or legend old, Or song heroically bold; But even these at length grew cold.
Page 437 - I saw two beings in the hues of youth Standing upon a hill, a gentle hill, Green and of mild declivity, the last As 'twere the cape of a long ridge of such, Save that there was no sea to lave its base, But a most living landscape...
Page 437 - Where had been heap'da mass of holy things For an unholy usage; they raked up, And shivering scraped with their cold skeleton hands The feeble ashes, and their feeble breath Blew for a little life, and made a flame Which was a mockery; then they lifted up Their eyes as it grew lighter, and beheld Each other's aspects - saw, and shriek'd, and died Even of their mutual hideousness they died, Unknowing who he was upon whose brow Famine had written Fiend.
Page 437 - The rivers, lakes, and ocean all stood still, And nothing stirred within their silent depths; Ships sailorless lay rotting on the sea, And their masts fell down piecemeal; as they...
Page 437 - And they were enemies; they met beside The dying embers of an altar-place Where had been heap'da mass of holy things For an unholy usage; they raked up, And shivering scraped with their cold skeleton hands The feeble ashes, and their feeble breath Blew for a little life, and made a flame Which was a mockery; then they lifted up Their eyes as it grew lighter, and beheld Each other's aspects - saw, and shriek'd, and died Even of their mutual hideousness they died...
Page 318 - But soon he knew himself the most unfit Of men to herd with Man, with whom he held Little in common; untaught to submit His thoughts to others, though his soul was quelled In youth by his own thoughts; still uncompelled, He would not yield dominion of his mind To Spirits against whom his own rebelled, Proud though in desolation— which could find A life within itself, to breathe without mankind.
Page 96 - Then the mortal coldness of the soul like death itself comes down ; It cannot feel for others...
Page 318 - The one was fire and fickleness, a child, Most mutable in wishes, but in mind A wit as various, — gay, grave, sage, or wild, — Historian, bard, philosopher, combined; He multiplied himself among mankind. The Proteus of their talents; but his own Breathed most in ridicule, — which, as the wind. Blew where it listed, laying all things prone, — Now to o'erthrow a fool, and now to shake a throne.

Bibliographic information