The Greeks and the New: Novelty in Ancient Greek Imagination and Experience (Google eBook)

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Cambridge University Press, Sep 15, 2011 - History
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The Greeks have long been regarded as innovators across a wide range of fields in literature, culture, philosophy, politics and science. However, little attention has been paid to how they thought and felt about novelty and innovation itself, and to relating this to the forces of traditionalism and conservatism which were also present across all the various societies within ancient Greece. What inspired the Greeks to embark on their unique and enduring innovations? How did they think and feel about the new? This book represents the first serious attempt to address these issues, and deals with the phenomenon across all periods and areas of classical Greek history and thought. Each chapter concentrates on a different area of culture or thought, while the book as a whole argues that much of the impulse towards innovation came from the life of the polis which provided its setting.
  

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Contents

Introduction
1
chapter 1 New new new
11
chapter 2 Loosening the grip of the past
36
chapter 3 The transformations of Kaineus
64
chapter 4 Old and new
85
chapter 5 Nothing new under the sun
108
chapter 6 The birth of Athena
134
chapter 7 Inventions of Eris
162
chapter 8 The newest song
184
chapter 9 Constructions of novelty
207
chapter 10 So whats new?
225
References
233
General index
247
Index of Greek terms
253
Index locorum
255
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About the author (2011)

Armand D'Angour is Fellow and Tutor in Classics at Jesus College, Oxford. This is his first book.

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