Alice's Adventures in Wonderland and Through the Looking Glass

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Penguin Books Limited, Jan 1, 1998 - Fiction - 356 pages
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Collecting Alice's complete adventures, a source of delight to children and adults alike for generations, the Penguin Classics edition of Lewis Carroll's Alice's Adventures in Wonderland and Through the Looking-Glass is edited with an introduction and notes by Hugh Haughton. Conjured up one 'golden afternoon' in 1862 to entertain Alice Liddell, the daughter of the dean of Carroll's college, the dream worlds of nonsensical Wonderland and back-to-front Looking-Glass kingdom depict order turned upside-down. Following the white rabbit into his warren, Alice falls into a world where croquet is played with hedgehogs and flamingos, a baby turns into a pig, time runs amok at a the Mad Hatter's tea-party, a chaotic game of chess makes Alice a Queen and the Mock Turtle and Gryphon dance the Lobster Quadrille. But amongst the anarchic humour and sparkling wordplay, unforgettable characters, puzzles and riddles, are poignant moments of nostalgia for a lost childhood. Original and experimental, adapted into countless film and television versions as Alice in Wonderland, the Alice books give readers a window on both child and adult worlds. This is the most comprehensively annotated edition available and includes the manuscript version of Alice's Adventures Under Ground and Carroll's 1887 essay '"Alice" on the stage'. Lewis Carroll (1832-1898) was the pen-name of the Reverend Charles Lutwidge Dodgson. Educated at Rugby School and Christ Church, Oxford, Carroll was appointed lecturer in mathematics in 1855, where he spent the rest of his life. In 1861 he took deacon's orders, but shyness and a constitutional stammer prevented him from seeking the priesthood. If you enjoyed Alice's Adventures in Wonderland you might like Mikhail Bulgakov's The Master and Margarita, also available in Penguin Classics. 'A work of glorious intelligence and literary devices ... nonsense becomes a form of higher sense'Malcolm Bradbury

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About the author (1998)

Charles Lutwidge Dodgson, known by his pen name, Lewis Carroll, was a man of diverse interests - in mathematics, logic, photgraphy, art, theater, religion, medicine, and science. He was happiest in the company of children for whom he created puzzles, clever games, and charming letters.

As all Carroll admirers know, his book Alice's Adventures in Wonderland (1865), became an immediate success and has since been translated into more than eighty languages. The equally popular sequel Through the Looking-Glass and What Alice Found There, was published in 1872.

The Alice books are but one example of his wide ranging authorship. The Hunting of the Snark, a classic nonsense epic (1876) and Euclid and His Modern Rivals, a rare example of humorous work concerning mathematics, still entice and intrigue today's students. Sylvie and Bruno, published toward the end of his life contains startling ideas including an 1889 description of weightlessness.

The humor, sparkling wit and genius of this Victorian Englishman have lasted for more than a century. His books are among the most quoted works in the English language, and his influence (with that of his illustrator, Sir John Tenniel) can be seen everywhere, from the world of advertising to that of atomic physics.


Hugh Haughton is a senior lecturer at the University of York. He edited Lewis Carroll's Alice's Adventures in Wonderland and Through the Looking-Glass for Penguin Classics.

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