The Earth's Blanket: Traditional Teachings for Sustainable Living

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University of Washington Press, 2007 - Nature - 298 pages
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This is a thought-provoking look at Native American stories, cultural institutions, and ways of knowing, and what they can teach us about living sustainably.

"A unique and charming book that provides fascinating insights into ways of managing wild plant and animal resources. Drawing on stories and early accounts from Native people throughout northwestern North America and, above all, her own enormously rich and detailed experiences, Nancy Turner shows that these methods have great and increasing relevance for us today." - Eugene Anderson, University of California, Riverside

"Nancy Turner has worked with and been befriended by generations of holders of our traditional teachings, and this book is a testament not only to an outstanding career but also to an outstanding human being. The Earth's Blanket demonstrates how science can be used to record Traditional Ecological Knowledge in a way that respects First Nations' cultures." - Kim Recalma-Clutesi, Elected Chief, Qualicum First Nation

"This wonderful book celebrates the connection between pepople and the land, revealing that the cultures of the world are unique and inspired expressions of the human imagination." - Wade Davis, author ofLight at the Edge of the World

Nancy J. Turneris distinguished professor in the School of Environmental Studies at the University of Victoria, British Columbia. She is also a research associate with the Royal British Columbia Museum and the author or co-author of more than fifteen books.

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User Review  - paperloverevolution - LibraryThing

I want to love Nancy Turner. Her topics always interest me. But the writing is so boring! Why must I have no discipline? Read full review

About the author (2007)

Nancy J. Turner is an ethnobotanist and distinguished professor in the School of Environmental Studies at the University of Victoria. She is also a research associate with the Royal British Columbia Museum.

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