New Boy

Front Cover
Houghton Mifflin Harcourt, 2005 - Juvenile Fiction - 282 pages
22 Reviews

Fifteen-year-old Rob Garrett wants nothing more than to escape the segregated South and prove himself. But in late 1950s Virginia, opportunity doesn’t come easily to an African American. So Rob’s parents take the unusual step of enrolling their son in a Connecticut boarding school, where he will have the best education available. He will also be the first student of color in the school’s history. No matter—Rob Garrett is on his way.
   But times are changing. While Rob is experiencing the privilege and isolation of private school, a movement is rising back home. Men and women are organizing, demanding an end to segregation, and in Rob’s hometown, his friends are on the verge of taking action. There is even talk about sitting in at a lunch counter that refuses to serve black people. How can Rob hope to make a difference when he’s a world away?

  

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Review: New Boy

User Review  - Annamarie - Goodreads

The character seems more like a vessel for historical information than an actual boy living through the time. While I think this book certainly serves a purpose, it was not an overly enjoyable reading experience for me. Read full review

Review: New Boy

User Review  - Skylar Brightbill - Goodreads

New Boy was a wonderful book, and had many great lessons within the story. At some times I was bored and wanted something great to happen. But otherwise a great book. Read full review

Selected pages

Contents

I
1
II
13
III
23
IV
36
V
52
VI
64
VII
73
VIII
80
XVII
152
XVIII
161
XIX
167
XX
179
XXI
192
XXII
206
XXIII
215
XXV
226

IX
89
X
101
XII
121
XIII
125
XIV
131
XV
136
XVI
143
XXVI
230
XXVIII
236
XXIX
249
XXX
256
XXXI
266
XXXII
272
Copyright

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About the author (2005)

Julian Houston was born in Richmond, Virginia, and educated in the public schools of that city before attending the Hotchkiss School in Lakeville, Connecticut. He attended Boston University and was a community organizer in Harlem during the civil rights movement. He is now an associate justice of the Superior Court of Massachusetts. Julian Houston lives in Brookline, Massachusetts, with his wife and family.