A Graveyard for Lunatics: Another Tale of Two Cities

Front Cover
Harper Collins, Jun 26, 2001 - Fiction - 320 pages
38 Reviews

Halloween Night, 1954.† A young, film-obsessed scriptwriter has just been hired at one of the great studios.† An anonymous investigation leads from the giant Maximus Films backlot to an eerie graveyard separated from the studio by a single wall.† There he makes a terrifying discovery that thrusts him into a maelstrom of intrigue and mystery -- and into the dizzy exhilaration of the movie industry at the height of its glittering power.

  

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Review: A Graveyard for Lunatics: Another Tale of Two Cities (Crumley Mysteries #2)

User Review  - Tasilee - Goodreads

Really queer and quirky tale of hollywood. Read full review

Review: A Graveyard for Lunatics: Another Tale of Two Cities (Crumley Mysteries #2)

User Review  - Keith - Goodreads

This is the book that started me reading Ray Bradbury again. Read full review

Contents

Section 1
3
Section 2
8
Section 3
22
Section 4
49
Section 5
82
Section 6
93
Section 7
96
Section 8
105
Section 15
179
Section 16
204
Section 17
206
Section 18
213
Section 19
223
Section 20
230
Section 21
241
Section 22
268

Section 9
112
Section 10
117
Section 11
124
Section 12
139
Section 13
159
Section 14
167
Section 23
276
Section 24
278
Section 25
280
Section 26
297
Section 27
309
Copyright

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Page 63 - I met a traveller from an antique land Who said: Two vast and trunkless legs of stone Stand in the desert . . . Near them, on the sand, Half sunk, a shattered visage lies, whose frown, And wrinkled lip, and sneer of cold command, Tell that its sculptor well those passions read Which yet survive, stamped on these lifeless things, The hand that mocked them, and the heart that fed: And on the pedestal these words appear: 'My name is Ozymandias, king of kings: Look on my works, ye Mighty, and despair!
Page 64 - Half sunk, a shattered visage lies, whose frown, And wrinkled lip, and sneer of cold command, Tell that its sculptor well those passions read Which yet survive, stamped on these lifeless things, The hand that mocked them, and the heart that fed : And on the pedestal these words appear : 'My name is Ozymandias, king of kings: Look on my works, ye Mighty, and despair !
Page 207 - Frenchies seek him everywhere. Is he in Heaven, is he in Hell? That damned elusive Pimpernel!
Page 85 - It was the finest work he had ever done, a proper thing to glide from a far-traveling light-year ship, a hunter of midnight paths across the stars, a dreamer alone behind his terrible, awful, most dreadfully appalling mask.
Page 221 - And suddenly it wasó Nineteen twenty-six. The opera singer in her dressing room and a voice behind the mirror urging, teaching, prompting, desiring her to step through the glass, a terrible Alice . . . dissolved in images, melting to descend to the underworld, led by the man in the dark cloak and white mask to a gondola that drifted on dark canal waters to a buried palace and a bed shaped like a coffin.
Page 5 - ... a victim of my own romance and infatuated madness over films that controlled life when it ran out of control beyond the Spanish wrought-iron front gates.
Page 7 - A great revelation awaits you. Material for a best-selling novel or superb screenplay. Don't miss it!
Page 98 - Crumley thought it over, snorted, strolled over, put his arm around my shoulder, and kissed me on the top of my head. "Accepted!
Page 167 - ... chariots rushing by in the air, or sand blowing across Beau Geste's ghost-haunted desert...

About the author (2001)

In a career spanning more than seventy years, Ray Bradbury, who died on June 5, 2011 at the age of 91, inspired generations of readers to dream, think, and create. A prolific author of hundreds of short stories and close to fifty books, as well as numerous poems, essays, operas, plays, teleplays, and screenplays, Bradbury was one of the most celebrated writers of our time. His groundbreaking works include Fahrenheit 451, The Martian Chronicles, The Illustrated Man, Dandelion Wine, and Something Wicked This Way Comes. He wrote the screen play for John Huston's classic film adaptation of Moby Dick, and was nominated for an Academy Award. He adapted sixty-five of his stories for television's The Ray Bradbury Theater, and won an Emmy for his teleplay of The Halloween Tree. He was the recipient of the 2000 National Book Foundation Medal for Distinguished Contribution to American Letters, the 2004 National Medal of Arts, and the 2007 Pulitzer Prize Special Citation, among many honors.

Throughout his life, Bradbury liked to recount the story of meeting a carnival magician, Mr. Electrico, in 1932. At the end of his performance Electrico reached out to the twelve-year-old Bradbury, touched the boy with his sword, and commanded, "Live forever!" Bradbury later said, "I decided that was the greatest idea I had ever heard. I started writing every day. I never stopped."

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