Ship 16: The True Story of a German Surface Raider Atlantis

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Amberley Publishing, Jan 1, 2009 - Technology & Engineering - 254 pages
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The story of Nazi Germany's most successful commerce raider of World War Two, sinking over 160,000 tons of Allied shipping. Ship 16 sank twenty-two British and Allied ships during its 110,000 miles and 602 days continuously - at sea until she was sunk by HMS Devonshire. Her exploits in the Atlantic and Indian Oceans over almost two years created huge problems for the Allies as they tried to find the mystery ship with twenty-six disguises. Sinking ship after ship, Atlantis also searched them for documents. Finding secret files on the Automedon regarding British troop dispositions in the Far East, this document hastened Japan's entry into the war. Eventually sunk in November 1941, the 350 crew of Atlantis, as Ship 16 had been named, were rescued by U-boat which towed them to the safety of the supply ship Python. Sunk again, four U-boats eventually took the survivors of both Atlantis and Python to safety in France. The story is told by the ship's First Officer and was recounted from his diaries kept aboard the Atlantis.
  

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Contents

Illustrations
7
Note by Admiral Rogge Foreword Preface
17
At Bremen
23
Wolf beneath the Fleece
29
Ware our Propellers
37
Running the Gauntlet
47
Corsairs and Kimonos
57
Baptism of Blood
63
Top Secret
141
Land
147
On the Rocks
155
A Grave in the South
161
Where Wolves Foregather
171
International Incident
181
Ships that Pass
193
The Strain begins to Tell
201

Danger Off Shore
73
Children beneath our Guns
83
Deadly Encounters
97
The Sinking of the Tirranna
107
Guests of the Führer
115
Hell Ship
125
That Dartmouth Look
133
Last Victim
209
Feindlicher Kreuzer in Sicht
219
And so We Sink
227
And Sink Again
235
Home by the Underwater Route
243
Epilogue by Captain Agar
251
Copyright

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About the author (2009)

Mohr is director of the Institute for Experimental Pathology at the Hannover Medical School.

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