An historical sketch of Watertown, in Massachusetts: from the first settlement of the town to the close of its second century (Google eBook)

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E. W. Metcalf and Company, 1830 - Watertown (Mass.) - 151 pages
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Page 134 - America: that we may walk before him, and serve him without fear in holiness and righteousness all the days of our lives...
Page 103 - For the LORD had made the host of the Syrians to hear a noise of chariots and a noise of horses, even the noise of a great host : and they said one to another, Lo, the king of Israel hath hired against us the kings of the Hittites and the kings of the Egyptians to come upon us. Wherefore they arose and fled in the twilight, and left their tents, and their horses, and their asses, even the camp, as it was, and fled for their life.
Page 109 - England, and alighted with eight sons, near Mount Wollaston. One of the sons returned to England, and after taking time to explore the country, four removed to Medfield and the neighboring towns; two to Chelmsford. One only, Joseph, who lies here at his left hand, remained here...
Page 139 - The churches' gem, the college glory. Angels may speak him — ah ! not I, — Whose worth's above hyperbole. But for our loss, wer't in my power, I'd weep an everlasting...
Page 35 - Watertown was, at the first, more acquainted with the way of church discipline, since owned by Congregational churches ; but being then without any to stand by him, (for wo to him that is alone,) he met with much opposition from some of the magistrates, till the time that Mr. Cotton came into the country, who, by his preaching and practice, did by degrees mould all their church administrations into the very same form which Mr. Phillips labored to have introduced into...
Page 136 - ... the same foundation in religion, as Anabaptists, Seekers, Antinomians, and the like, might be permitted to live among you, to which I received this short answer from your then governor, Mr. Dudley: God forbid (said he) our love for the truth should be grown so cold that we should tolerate errors.
Page 103 - Britain, at the expense of three millions, has killed one hundred and fifty Yankees this campaign, which is twenty thousand pounds a head ; and at Bunker's Hill she gained a mile of ground, half of which she lost again by our taking post on Ploughed Hill. During the same time sixty * thousand children have been born in America. From these data his mathematical head will easily calculate the time and expense necessary to kill us all, and conquer our whole territory.
Page 21 - ... that it was not safe to pay moneys after that sort, for fear of bringing themselves §and posterity § into bondage.
Page 136 - We pray for you and wish you prosperity every way, hoped the Lord would have given you so much light and love there, that you might have been eyes to God's people here, and not to practice those courses in a wilderness, which you went so far to prevent.
Page 6 - So absolute, indeed, was the authority of the crown, that the precious spark of liberty had been kindled and was preserved by the Puritans ; and it was to this sect, whose principles appear so frivolous, and habits so ridiculous, that the English owe the whole freedom of their constitution.

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