Georg Wilhelm Friedrich Hegel: The Science of Logic (Google eBook)

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Cambridge University Press, Aug 19, 2010 - Philosophy - 790 pages
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This 2010 translation of The Science of Logic (also known as 'Greater Logic') includes the revised Book I (1832), Book II (1813) and Book III (1816). Recent research has given us a detailed picture of the process that led Hegel to his final conception of the System and of the place of the Logic within it. We now understand how and why Hegel distanced himself from Schelling, how radical this break with his early mentor was, and to what extent it entailed a return (but with a difference) to Fichte and Kant. In the introduction to the volume, George Di Giovanni presents in synoptic form the results of recent scholarship on the subject, and, while recognizing the fault lines in Hegel's System that allow opposite interpretations, argues that the Logic marks the end of classical metaphysics. The translation is accompanied by a full apparatus of historical and explanatory notes.
  

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Contents

Acknowledgments page
viii
Translators note
lxiii
volume
7
Introduction
23
the doctrine of being
45
determinateness quality
58
Existence
83
Beingforitself
126
The becoming of essence
326
the doctrine of essence
337
essence as reflection within
340
The essentialities or the determinations of reflection
354
Ground
386
appearance
418
Appearance
437
actuality
465

magnitude quantity
152
Quantum
168
Ratio or the quantitative relation
271
measure
282
Real measure
302
The absolute relation
489
volume
507
Hegels Logic in its revised and unrevised parts
754
Index
777
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About the author (2010)

George Di Giovanni is Professor of Philosophy at McGill University, Montréal. His previous publications include Freedom and Religion in Kant and his Immediate Successors: The Vocation of Humankind, 1774–1800 (Cambridge University Press, 2005), Between Kant and Hegel: Texts in the Development of Post-Kantian Idealism (2000) and a title in the series The Cambridge Edition of the Works of Immanuel Kant, Religion and Rational Theology (Cambridge, 1996).

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