World Industrial Archaeology

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CUP Archive, Apr 5, 1979 - Social Science - 247 pages
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Since the 1950s, when the phrase 'industrial archaeology' was coined, there has been an enormous growth of interest in what have come to be seen as the monuments of our more recent past. One result of this is that all kinds of old industrial plant, once valued only for what it could produce or do, have been accorded an intrinsic value often tinged with a somewhat incongruous nostalgia. In this book Kenneth Hudson sets out to restore these monuments to their place at the centre of the wider history they embody, social and economic as well as technical. Less than this, he claims, cannot properly be called industrial archaeology. Taking each major industry in turn Mr Hudson provides fully illustrated examples from many countries. By making this a study of world industrial archaeology, Mr Hudson escapes from the idea that the subject is confined to a period roughly denoted by the Industrial Revolution in England.
  

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Contents

Section One The techniques appropriate to the study
13
The extractive industries
37
Food and drink
63
purpose design and materials
86
Metal processing
110
Transport
134
Textiles clothing footwear
160
Power
187
Chemicals and related industries
212
Conclusions
232
Index
243
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