The Chemical Gazette, Volume 3 (Google eBook)

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1845 - Chemistry
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Page 337 - ... there was no ebullition ; but as it slowly cooled, boiling took place. In this experiment, it appeared as if the glowing metal formed around itself an atmosphere ; and the contiguous surfaces of the water appeared like a silvered plate. The application of the principles involved in these phenomena to the tempering of metals was then explained. If a metal to be tempered is in a highly incandescent state, the necessary hardening will not take place on plunging it into water. It is, therefore, necessary...
Page 83 - Fahr., and distils at that temperature without alteration. It dissolves to a large extent in cold water and also in alcohol. Its solution in concentrated sulphuric acid has a magnificent purple colour, and is decomposed by water. Nitric acid, with the aid of...
Page 334 - The velocity of air being !, the velocity of oxygen was found to be -9500 by experiment, and by calculation -9487. Carbonic acid, being much heavier than air, gave the number -812. Carburetted hydrogen gave -1322 as the velocity of its effusion. Hydrogen gave as the velocity of effusion 3-613 by experiment, which was very nearly the amount given by theory. The interference of friction, even of minute orifices, was then described, and shown to admit of easy correction. Some useful applications...
Page 336 - Many specimens were exhibited of copper and other metals coated with brass. The author makes some remarks on the theory of the action; and concludes by stating that it will be quite possible to determine, within certain limits, the character of the alloy that shall present itself, and that we may be enabled to throw...
Page 270 - ... Bohemia, a peculiar ruby colour, which is also employed in cakes, and has received the name of Bohemian Ruby. It is prepared by melting together quartz powdered and fritted 100, minium 150, potash fritted 30, borax fritted 20, sulphuret of antimony 5, peroxide of manganese 5, fulminating gold rubbed in with oil of turpentine 5. If a little more fulminating gold is used, a magnificent ruby colour is obtained. Fulminating gold is obtained by precipitating the solution of gold in aqua regia by ammonia,...
Page 173 - ... coal gas from its sulphur or sulphuretted hydrogen, the patentees include, not only the above sulphate and chloride, but also the sulphuret of manganese, among the waste or refuse products, which they convert into a valuable peroxide of that metal. This invention is also applicable for converting all oxides, carbonates, and other combinations of manganese, whether native or factitious, which contain the metal in an inferior state of oxidation, into a superoxide of manganese, adapted to produce...
Page 83 - When in contact with water, or when not properly rendered anhydrous, it is less subject to change, and merely assumes a yellow colour. Its odour resembles that of a mixture of bitter almond oil and oil of cassia, but has less fragrance. Its specific gravity at 60 Fahr.
Page 336 - The process adopted is to prepare a strong solution of cyanide of potassium, and commence electrolysing it by means of a copper anode ; as soon as copper begins to be dissolved, the copper anode is removed, and its place supplied with one of zinc ; after the action has continued for some little time, brass will be liberated on the cathode. The solution is now ready for use, and is operated upon by two or three Daniell-s cells, and with a brass anode.
Page 222 - ... to keep a cow, without being subject for these to any extra labour or manorial dues ; so that it is extremely difficult to fix in a precise manner the real pay of the workmen, and of course the cost of the glass. Of the Expense for Fuel. I shall...
Page 334 - ... exhausted by the pump, and the velocity with which the air passed through the stucco being marked" by the mercurial gauge of the pump. The transpiration of atmospheric air was found to be greater than that of oxygen. Carbonic acid is found to be more transpirable than oxygen or even, under low pressure, than atmospheric air. The transpiration of hydrogen is one-third more rapid than that of oxygen. The applicability of this process of experimenting to the explanation of exosmose and endosmose...

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