Algorithms in Java, Parts 1-4 (Google eBook)

Front Cover
Addison-Wesley Professional, Jul 23, 2002 - Computers - 768 pages
11 Reviews

This edition of Robert Sedgewick's popular work provides current and comprehensive coverage of important algorithms for Java programmers. Michael Schidlowsky and Sedgewick have developed new Java implementations that both express the methods in a concise and direct manner and provide programmers with the practical means to test them on real applications.

Many new algorithms are presented, and the explanations of each algorithm are much more detailed than in previous editions. A new text design and detailed, innovative figures, with accompanying commentary, greatly enhance the presentation. The third edition retains the successful blend of theory and practice that has made Sedgewick's work an invaluable resource for more than 400,000 programmers!

This particular book, Parts 1-4 , represents the essential first half of Sedgewick's complete work. It provides extensive coverage of fundamental data structures and algorithms for sorting, searching, and related applications. Although the substance of the book applies to programming in any language, the implementations by Schidlowsky and Sedgewick also exploit the natural match between Java classes and abstract data type (ADT) implementations.

Highlights

  • Java class implementations of more than 100 important practical algorithms
  • Emphasis on ADTs, modular programming, and object-oriented programming
  • Extensive coverage of arrays, linked lists, trees, and other fundamental data structures
  • Thorough treatment of algorithms for sorting, selection, priority queue ADT implementations, and symbol table ADT implementations (search algorithms)
  • Complete implementations for binomial queues, multiway radix sorting, randomized BSTs, splay trees, skip lists, multiway tries, B trees, extendible hashing, and many other advanced methods
  • Quantitative information about the algorithms that gives you a basis for comparing them
  • More than 1,000 exercises and more than 250 detailed figures to help you learn properties of the algorithms

Whether you are learning the algorithms for the first time or wish to have up-to-date reference material that incorporates new programming styles with classic and new algorithms, you will find a wealth of useful information in this book.

  

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Contents

I
3
II
4
III
7
IV
11
V
22
VI
24
VII
27
VIII
28
LXVIII
357
LXIX
359
LXX
363
LXXI
366
LXXII
370
LXXIII
373
LXXIV
377
LXXV
381

IX
33
X
36
XI
44
XII
49
XIII
53
XIV
60
XV
69
XVI
70
XVII
84
XVIII
91
XIX
97
XX
107
XXI
111
XXII
116
XXIII
127
XXIV
137
XXV
139
XXVI
142
XXVII
148
XXVIII
154
XXIX
157
XXX
165
XXXI
173
XXXII
177
XXXIII
188
XXXIV
194
XXXV
197
XXXVI
198
XXXVII
206
XXXVIII
219
XXXIX
236
XL
240
XLI
251
XLII
257
XLIII
259
XLIV
261
XLV
263
XLVI
265
XLVII
270
XLVIII
283
XLIX
285
L
288
LI
295
LII
300
LIII
308
LIV
312
LV
315
LVI
316
LVII
321
LVIII
325
LIX
328
LX
331
LXI
336
LXII
339
LXIII
341
LXIV
347
LXV
348
LXVI
351
LXVII
353
LXXVI
383
LXXVII
389
LXXVIII
396
LXXIX
402
LXXX
406
LXXXI
417
LXXXII
419
LXXXIII
423
LXXXIV
427
LXXXV
435
LXXXVI
441
LXXXVII
444
LXXXVIII
448
LXXXIX
453
XC
455
XCI
460
XCII
468
XCIII
474
XCIV
480
XCV
486
XCVI
494
XCVII
495
XCVIII
497
XCIX
507
C
511
CI
519
CII
524
CIII
531
CIV
537
CV
542
CVI
546
CVII
555
CVIII
559
CIX
566
CX
572
CXI
577
CXII
587
CXIII
595
CXIV
599
CXV
600
CXVI
610
CXVII
615
CXVIII
620
CXIX
625
CXX
629
CXXI
635
CXXII
637
CXXIII
641
CXXIV
660
CXXV
679
CXXVI
685
CXXVII
687
CXXVIII
690
CXXIX
692
CXXX
706
CXXXI
718
CXXXII
723
CXXXIII
727
Copyright

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Page x - Java; this book is here to fill that space. We wrote the sample programs as utility methods to be used in a variety of contexts. To that end, we did not use the Java package mechanism. To focus on the algorithms at hand (and to expose the algorithmic basis of many fundamental library classes), we avoided the standard Java library in favor of more fundamental types. Proper error checking and other defensive practices would both substantially increase the amount of code and distract the reader from...

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About the author (2002)

Robert Sedgewick is the William O. Baker Professor of Computer Science at Princeton University. He is a Director of Adobe Systems and has served on the research staffs at Xerox PARC, IDA, and INRIA. He earned his Ph.D from Stanford University under Donald E. Knuth.

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