The New monthly magazine and universal register. [Continued as] The New monthly magazine and literary journal (and humorist) [afterw.] The New monthly (magazine). (Google eBook)

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1839
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Page 292 - ... of hunting to shoote with gunnes and bowes ; and grey-hound hunting is not so martial a game. As for hawkinge, I condemn it not; but I must praise it more sparingly, because it neither resembleth the wars so...
Page 524 - I pray you, speak not ; he grows worse and worse; Question enrages him : at once, good night : Stand not upon the order of your going, But go at once.
Page 517 - Whittington was (in the church) three times buried : first, by his executors, under a fair monument ; then in the reign of Edward VI. the parson of that church, thinking some great riches (as he said) to be buried with him, caused his monument to be broken, his body to be spoiled of his leaden sheet, and again the second time to be buried ; and in the reign of Queen Mary, the parishioners were forced to take him up, and lap him in lead, as afore, to bury him the third time, and to place his monument,...
Page 60 - When all the viands were brought in, the first figure began with kicking out the dogs, which are seemingly wolves made tame with starving and beating, they being the worst dog masters in the world ; so that it is an infallible cure for sore eyes, ever to see an Indian's dog fat...
Page 133 - But the chiefest jewel they bring from thence is their Maypole, which they bring home with great veneration, as thus...
Page 292 - it is enough for the sons of the nobility to wind their horn and carry their hawk fair, and leave study and learning to the children of meaner people.
Page 516 - College, and left a maintenance for so many people, as above related, they were, as Stow records | it (for this maintenance), bound to pray for the good estate of Richard Whittington, and . Alice his wife, their founders; and for Sir William Whittington, and dame Joan his wife; and for Hugh Fitzwarren, and dame Molde his wife, the fathers and mothers of the said Richard Whittington and Alice his wife: For king Richard the Second, and Thomas of Woodstock, duke of Gloucester, special lords and promoters...
Page 292 - ... and balladines to win their bread with: but the exercises that I would have you to use, although but moderately, not making a craft of them, are, running, leaping, wrestling, fencing, dancing, and playing at the caitch, or tennise, archerie, palle-malle, and such like other fair and pleasant field-games.
Page 517 - To maintain war in France, Glory from thence to bring. And after, at a feast Which he the king did make, He burnt the bonds all in jest, And would no money take.
Page 129 - When May is in his prime, Then may each heart rejoice : When May bedecks each branch with green, Each bird strains forth his voice. The lively sap creeps up Into the blooming thorn : The flowers, which cold in prison kept, Now laugh the frost to scorn.

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