North of South: An African Journey

Front Cover
Penguin, 1980 - Political Science - 349 pages
15 Reviews
When her father leaves the Church in a crisis of conscience, Margaret Hale is uprooted from her comfortable home in Hampshire to move with her family to the north of England. Initially repulsed by the ugliness of her new surroundings in the industrial town of Milton, Margaret becomes aware of the poverty and suffering of the local mill workers and develops a passionate sense of social justice. This is intensified by her tempestuous relationship with the mill-owner and self-made man, John Thornton, as their fierce opposition over his treatment of his employees masks a deeper attraction. In North and South, Elizabeth Gaskell skillfully fused individual feeling with social concern, and in Margaret Hale created one of the most original heroines of Victorian literature.
  

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Review: North of South: An African Journey (Classic, 20th-Century, Penguin)

User Review  - Angela - Goodreads

Wow. Basically hated this. Tedious, aimless, superficial. I had to skim the last 20% of this book, as I just couldn't bear to read any more of Naipaul's one-note caricaturing of East Africa, or, as ... Read full review

Review: North of South: An African Journey

User Review  - Eric Sondermann - Goodreads

Perhaps now dated. But powerfully captures many dynamics of Africa circa a few decades ago. Read full review

Contents

IV
35
V
68
VI
85
VII
96
VIII
123
IX
170
X
195
XI
197
XII
213
XIII
221
XIV
241
XV
263
XVI
299
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