Darkness at Dawn: The Rise of the Russian Criminal State

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Yale University Press, Sep 1, 2004 - History - 314 pages
3 Reviews
Anticipating a new dawn of freedom after the disintegration of the Soviet Union, Russians could hardly have foreseen the reality of their future a decade later: a country impoverished and controlled at every level by organized crime. This riveting book views the 1990s reform period through the experiences of individual citizens, revealing the changes that have swept Russia and their effect on Russia’s age-old ways of thinking.

“The Russia that Satter depicts in this brave, engaging book cannot be ignored. Darkness at Dawn should be required reading for anyone interested in the post-Soviet state.”—Christian Caryl, Newsweek

“Satter must be commended for saying what a great many people only dare to think.”—Matthew Brzezinski, Toronto Globe and Mail

“Humane and articulate.”—Raymond Asquith, Spectator

“Vivid, impeccably researched and truly frightening. . . . Western policy-makers, especially in Washington, would do well to study these pages.”—Martin Sieff, United Press International
  

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Darkness at dawn: the rise of the Russian criminal state

User Review  - Not Available - Book Verdict

Nearly all of the books written about Russia in the past ten years, such as Lilia Shevtsova's Putin's Russia and David E.Hoffman's The Oligarchs: Wealth and Power in the New Russia, have indicted ... Read full review

Review: Darkness at Dawn: The Rise of the Russian Criminal State

User Review  - Marnie - Goodreads

Absolutely horrifying, frightening to see what can be done to a population with no chance of retribution. Read full review

Contents

The Kursk
5
Ryazan
24
The Young Reformers
34
The History of Reform
45
The Gold Seekers
72
The Workers
93
Law Enforcement
112
Organized Crime
127
Krasnoyarsk
182
The Value of Human Life
198
The Criminalization of Consciousness
222
Does Russia Have a Future?
248
Notes
257
Bibliography
289
Acknowledgments
303
Index
305

Ulyanovsk
156
Vladivostok
165

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About the author (2004)

David Satter, former Moscow correspondent for the Financial Times of London, is affiliated with the Hoover Institution, the Hudson Institute, and the Johns Hopkins University Nitze School of Advanced International Studies (SAIS). He is the author of Age of Delirium: The Decline and Fall of the Soviet Union, also available from Yale University Press.

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