Life of Geoffrey Chaucer: The Early English Poet: Including Memoirs of His Near Friend and Kinsman, John of Gaunt, Duke of Lancaster: with Sketches of the Manners, Opinions, Arts and Literature of England in the Fourteenth Century, Volume 3 (Google eBook)

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T. Davison, 1804 - Great Britain - 516 pages
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Page 266 - It commonly consists of thirteen lines or verses, of which eight have one rhyme, and five another. It is divided into three couplets, and at the end of the second and third, the beginning of the rondeau is repeated, if possible, in an equivocal or punning sense.
Page 350 - Beynge desyerous to knowe the name of the Autoure of this most worthy worke (gentle reader) and the tyme of the writynge of the same: I did not onely gather togyther suche aunciente copies as I could come by, but also consult such men as I knew to be more exercised in the studie of antiquities...
Page 343 - Wiclifie, does not seem ever to have enlisted himself in the party of the Lollards. In the Testament of Love, he expresses his belief in the real presence; and in the discourse of the Person, with which the CT are concluded, he declaims with great emphasis for the utility of auricular confession.
Page 266 - RON'DEAU, a species of poetry, usually consisting of thirteen verses, of which eight have one rhyme, and five another. It is divided into three couplets, and at the end of the second and third, the beginning of the rondeau is repeated in an equivocal sense, if possible.
Page 335 - Hence the practice arose of presenting petitions directly to the Chancellor, upon which the Chancellor made decrees, giving or withholding redress according to principles which were certainly not always those of the common law. This practice, which dates from the end of the reign of Edward III., or the beginning of that of Richard II., may be taken to be the cause of the rise of the judicial functions of the Chancellor. Upon petitions thus presented the Chancellor would, if he thought fit, issue...
Page 23 - Sufficeth me, as I were ded, That no wight have my name in honde. I wot myself best how y stonde; For what I drye, or what I thynke, I wil myselven al hyt drynke, 1880 Certeyn, for the more part, As fer forth as I kan myn art.
Page 413 - Commons ; and we shall be at a loss to understand many circumstances in the history of this period, if we do not distinctly recollect that the wealthy merchants of England and the neighbouring countries were now enabled to enter into a sort of rivalship with the ancient barons, which these latter wished, perhaps, but were not able, to despise- The citizens had not yet learned the sordid habits of later times, and appear to have copied with success the purest models that were afforded them by their...
Page 363 - And for his verses, although in divers places they may seeme to us to stand of unequal! measures: yet a skilfull Reader, that can scan them in their nature, shall find it otherwise.

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