On the Genealogy of Morality (Google eBook)

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Hackett Publishing, Mar 13, 1998 - Philosophy - 224 pages
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This new edition is the product of a collaboration between a Germanist and a philosopher who is also a Nietzsche scholar. The translation strives not only to communicate a sense of Nietzsche's style but also to convey his meaning accurately--and thus to be an important advance on previous translations of this work. A superb set of notes ensures that Clark and Swensen's Genealogy will become the new edition of choice for classroom use.

  

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DON'T GET FOOLED BY WHAT THE "HERD" SAYS - IT IS BRILLIANT!
This is a brilliant book and an amazing translation and intro by Clark & Swenson.
Probably not the best book to start with on your
journey with Nietzsche.
As you will see with the other reviews, there are a whole host of people who plainly have not the foggiest notion of what he is trying to address here.
He is arguably the greatest Philosopher in the era after Kant - BUT you have to read him slowly and try to grasp what he is on about.
He writes (I would argue) on three levels: the shallow level - polemicist; the intermediate level to fool sleepy university profs and students; and the deepest level - accessible by those who work at it.
For example - in GofM: does he offer a positive morality - my answer is not YES / NO but rather he is saying this is the wrong question. Even if there was one GOOD morality, we would never recognize it.
To see a brilliant treatment along my lines - see Clark's reading of Beyond Good and Evil out this summer of 2012 - a brilliant and in-depth reading of that critical work.
Good luck and have fun with N.
 

Contents

Preface
1
Good and Evil Good and Bad
9
Guilt Bad Conscience and Related Matters
35
Third Treatise What Do Ascetic Ideals Mean?
67
End Notes
119
Index
169
Copyright

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About the author (1998)

Maudemarie Clark is Professor of Philosophy, Colgate University. Alan J. Swensen is Associate Professor of German, Colgate University.

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