A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man (Google eBook)

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B. W. Huebsch, Incorporated, 1916 - Artists - 299 pages
295 Reviews
  

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Amazing style and prose, as well as substance. - Goodreads
He is not easy to read. - Goodreads
He's a great writer. - Goodreads
Good portrayal of what Catholic indoctrination does. - Goodreads
The writing was amazing. - Goodreads
It works better as poetry and not prose. - Goodreads

Review: A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man

User Review  - Zorena - Goodreads

It's been many years since I last read Joyce and I realized I had been remiss in not reading this one sooner. Now that I have read it I am trying to figure out why it's considered his best. This books ... Read full review

Review: A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man

User Review  - Justin Evans - Goodreads

It says something for this book that as I was re-reading it I kept feeling like I was, for instance, riding home on a Melbourne tram, or sitting at a university coffee shop: yes, I was obsessed with ... Read full review

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Selected pages

Contents

I
1
II
65
III
115
IV
170
V
202

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Page 299 - Welcome, O life! I go to encounter for the millionth time the reality of experience and to forge in the smithy of my soul the uncreated conscience of my race.
Page 129 - Then he shall say to them also that shall be on his left hand: Depart from me, you cursed, into everlasting fire, which was prepared for the devil and his angels.
Page 221 - The language in which we are speaking is his before it is mine. How different are the words home, Christ, ale, master, on his lips and on mine! I cannot speak or write these words without unrest of spirit. His language, so familiar and so foreign, will always be for me an acquired speech. I have not made or accepted its words. My voice holds them at bay. My soul frets in the shadow of his language.
Page 252 - The dramatic form is reached when the vitality which has flowed and eddied round each person fills every person with such vital force that he or she assumes a proper and intangible esthetic life.
Page 299 - Away! Away! The spell of arms and voices: the white arms of roads, their promise of close embraces and the black arms of tall ships that stand against the moon, their tale of distant nations. They are held out to say: We are alone. Come.
Page 240 - The feelings excited by improper art are kinetic, desire or loathing. Desire urges us to possess, to go to something; loathing urges us to abandon, to go from something. These are kinetic emotions. The arts which excite them, pornographical or didactic, are therefore improper arts. The esthetic emotion (I use the general term) is therefore static. The mind is arrested and raised above desire and loathing.
Page 194 - No, it was not their colours: it was the poise and balance of the period itself. Did he then love the rhythmic rise and fall of words better than their associations of legend and colour? Or was it that, being as weak of sight as he was shy of mind, he drew less pleasure from the reflection of the glowing sensible world through the prism of a language manycoloured and richly storied than from the contemplation of an inner world of individual emotions mirrored perfectly in a lucid supple periodic prose.
Page 297 - Michael Robartes remembers forgotten beauty and, when his arms wrap her round, he presses in his arms the loveliness which has long faded from the world. Not this. Not at all. I desire to press in my arms the loveliness which has not yet come into the world.
Page 284 - Stephen began to enumerate glibly his father's attributes. A medical student, an oarsman, a tenor, an amateur actor, a shouting politician, a small landlord, a small investor, a drinker, a good fellow, a storyteller, somebody's secretary, something in a distillery, a tax-gatherer, a bankrupt and at present a praiser of his own past.
Page 101 - It shocked him to find in the outer world a trace of what he had deemed till then a brutish and individual malady of his own mind.

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